young people – FPRU http://fpru.org/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 20:33:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fpru.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon-1-150x150.png young people – FPRU http://fpru.org/ 32 32 Hear from frontline staff during the debate on the future of Manson Youth Facility https://fpru.org/hear-from-frontline-staff-during-the-debate-on-the-future-of-manson-youth-facility/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 05:01:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/hear-from-frontline-staff-during-the-debate-on-the-future-of-manson-youth-facility/ The future of the Manson Youth Institution in Cheshire has been a hot topic of discussion and debate. Unfortunately, lawmakers and advocates have neglected to listen to a key stakeholder – the frontline staff tasked with maintaining safety, security and programming within the institution. I am one of those frontline people, having spent the vast […]]]>

The future of the Manson Youth Institution in Cheshire has been a hot topic of discussion and debate. Unfortunately, lawmakers and advocates have neglected to listen to a key stakeholder – the frontline staff tasked with maintaining safety, security and programming within the institution.

I am one of those frontline people, having spent the vast majority of my 19 years as a corrections officer at MYI. My colleagues at AFSCME Local 387 join me in stressing the importance of keeping MYI open while making the necessary investments in staffing, programming and facility design.

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Access Tsar presents plans to implement school-university orientation https://fpru.org/access-tsar-presents-plans-to-implement-school-university-orientation/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 16:57:32 +0000 https://fpru.org/access-tsar-presents-plans-to-implement-school-university-orientation/ England’s new Equitable Access Director has detailed planned changes to access agreements with universities to implement its focus on “strategic academic engagement, quality and non-traditional pathways”, and champion the focus put on the results of graduates in terms of “high-level jobs”. John Blake, director of equitable access and participation at the Office for Students, had […]]]>

England’s new Equitable Access Director has detailed planned changes to access agreements with universities to implement its focus on “strategic academic engagement, quality and non-traditional pathways”, and champion the focus put on the results of graduates in terms of “high-level jobs”.

John Blake, director of equitable access and participation at the Office for Students, had followed his call for universities to “put their shoulders to the wheel” to increase the level of achievement in schools. His speech at an OfS event explained how planned changes to Access and Participation Plans (APPs) would help achieve this.

“One of the main factors of low access is the low level of education. We need to change this dial and intervene much earlier,” he said.

Mr Blake, who previously led policy issues for the educational charity Ark, which runs the Ark Schools multi-academy trust, said there would be a three-step process to implement the reforms made “more urgent by Covid”.

In terms of monitoring current APPs, “we will not require monitoring feedback from each vendor,” he said. “Instead, we will undertake risk-based feedback of the data we hold and will only follow up with individual vendors where we have concerns. This will be a tangible reduction in regulatory burden for the many universities and colleges that are well on their way to achieving the goals they have set for themselves.

In stage two, the OfS “will ask providers to review their current APP and look for variations to ensure the full breadth of their work on strategic school engagement, quality and non-traditional pathways is captured. for the 2023 deals, a process he said the regulator would “expect to start before the summer and wrap up before Christmas.”

On the third step, Mr Blake said that “subject to consultation”, the regulator aims to align the APP cycle with the mandate of the Director of Fair Access, and “advance the cycle by one year. ‘access and participation’.

“The new APPs will start from September 2024 and last for up to four years,” he said.

“When we consult to update our guidance for this PPA cycle, we will include lessons learned on strategic school engagement, quality, pathways and evaluation” of engagement with providers on variations of current chords, he said.

The regulator “would consider using our enforcement tools in areas where providers are failing to meet their commitments,” he added.

In its new emerging quality requirements, the OfS emphasizes graduate outcomes in terms of progression into ‘professional and management’ jobs.

Mr. Blake said: “Participation and progression are part of the same challenge. So we absolutely expect to be engaged in a lot of discussions about how providers make sure people can move on to postgraduate studies, in the labor market.

Critics objected that “you make universities responsible for the whole economy,” he said.

“I’m not, but universities are also important civic entities in their region,” he continued. “They have mobilizing power, they have their own economic power – there are providers who sign contracts and insist that those they sign their contracts with take some of their apprenticeship students. There are ways and means to do this.

Mr Blake said students should have equal access to good higher education outcomes.

“That won’t always mean high-level work,” he added. “But we also have to be honest, that’s why a lot of young people go to university. That’s what they expect. It is [why] the providers who invited them…must make sure they put their shoulder to the wheel to ensure that the best possible outcomes for these students occur.

john.morgan@timeshighereducation.com

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Beebe: Let’s talk about Iowa public school teachers | Opinion https://fpru.org/beebe-lets-talk-about-iowa-public-school-teachers-opinion/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/beebe-lets-talk-about-iowa-public-school-teachers-opinion/ Submitted by Raymond Beebe I want to start by quoting from the commencement address I gave at Waldorf University on May 8, 2021. “I also want to talk to you about success – what it is and what it isn’t. It’s not about making a lot of money, becoming CEO of a big company, or […]]]>

Submitted by Raymond Beebe

I want to start by quoting from the commencement address I gave at Waldorf University on May 8, 2021.

“I also want to talk to you about success – what it is and what it isn’t. It’s not about making a lot of money, becoming CEO of a big company, or reach the pinnacle of social status. The true definition of success is a life and work that brings personal fulfillment and lasting relationships and makes a difference in the world. Nelson Mandela said: “What matters in life is no is not the mere fact that we have lived. It’s the difference we make in the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we ​​live.'”

So why am I mentioning this in the context of Iowa teachers? Let me explain. I have been fortunate for several years to mentor a number of young men in our community. This message is something I always share with young people who aspire to become teachers. They already know they won’t get rich working as a teacher, but I stress the satisfaction they will get from “making a difference” in the lives of hundreds of young people throughout their careers. Wow, what can be more important than that?

People also read…

So you would think that our state would want to honor, respect and support its teachers, wouldn’t you? But how do teachers see the environment for them in the state of Iowa? Frankly not very well! And don’t take my word for it; go talk to some teachers. Our teachers must have been really impressed when the GOP-controlled legislature opened this year’s session with Senate Speaker Jake Chapman and Senator Brad Zaun, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, telling us that teachers are pushing a ” sinister agenda” and they also talked about criminalizing books and arresting teachers and librarians.

Chapman is trying to create a new criminal offense for educators and Senator Zaun, who also supports such a move, said, “My warning to all teachers and administrators is that you are going to be in jail.” So now teachers can be jailed if the “wrong” book ends up in the school library! They did not explain who will be able to judge a piece of literature inappropriate. Will this kind of rhetoric encourage our current teachers or cause teachers from other states to move to Iowa? (I should also note that the Chapman/Zaun tirade went viral and was seen nationwide.) I could go on at length on this, but I’ll just say that schools in Iowa have already set up effective mechanisms for reviewing material.

Democratic Senator Herman Quirmbach said it well: “Education professionals strike a balance between challenging material and age-appropriate material. I trust these professionals to continue to do the great work which I believe they did in Iowa.”

Superintendent Lehmann provided me with 19 pages of policy used in the Forest City Community School District regarding program evaluation, academic freedom, and selection of instructional materials. I would much rather leave this in the hands of our educators and administrators than Senator Chapman! Oh, by the way, did the other Republican senators rise to disassociate themselves from this wacky rhetoric? There were maybe a couple but it seems the majority had no problem with it!

So what do we do to show our appreciation to our teachers? Unfortunately, it’s not how much we pay them. Newsweek recently published a list of the top 20 paying states for public elementary and secondary school teachers. Iowa is not on this list. Insider had Iowa 23rd in teacher pay out of 50 states. ZipRecruiter says Iowa ranks 37th in teacher salaries. Now, I’m not one to fall in love with magazine rankings, but the numbers I see certainly suggest that our state district with a country school and “Foundation in Education” printed on the back no longer says it as it is. ‘It is !

Another metric is spending per student in public schools where Iowa ranks 29th in the nation. In my article published in the February 1 Summit/Tribune, I went into detail to demonstrate that our public schools are not sufficiently funded. I mentioned that Supplementary State Assistance (SSA), the amount of new funding available to schools, has only increased an average of 1.73% per year since 2011, which doesn’t even keep up the rate of inflation and, when coupled with a 3% to 5% increase in operating costs in the Iowa middle school, suggests we are rolling back. I said Iowa had a big surplus last year that could have been used to help us catch up. And to make matters worse, Governor Reynolds is proposing a flat income tax of 4% and it is estimated that the impact of this tax cut on an annual basis, when fully implemented, will be approximately 1. $7 billion. Public education accounts for 42% of the state’s general fund expenditures, so if general fund revenue declines by $1.7 billion, public education’s share of that loss is $714 million. This would suggest that even greater reductions for public education are likely in our future if the flat tax is actually implemented.

I think back to 2004 when the neighborhood in Iowa was introduced. We were all proud at that time because it seemed like our public schools were in the top five states in just about every category. Wouldn’t it be great to make public education in Iowa a priority again?

I hope each of you will “stand up” and speak on behalf of our wonderful young people. They are after all our most valuable asset and they deserve the best education we can give them.

Other thoughts will follow.

Raymond Beebe was vice president, general counsel and secretary of Winnebago Industries, Inc. for 38 years. He is currently President of the Forest City Education Foundation and Chairman of the Board of the Waldorf University Foundation.

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Former private school principal backs changes to public school system – The Royal Gazette https://fpru.org/former-private-school-principal-backs-changes-to-public-school-system-the-royal-gazette/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 11:53:33 +0000 https://fpru.org/former-private-school-principal-backs-changes-to-public-school-system-the-royal-gazette/ Updated: January 26, 2022 07:54 Susan Moench has retired from Mount Saint Agnes Academy after 14 years as principal of the school (Photograph by Jessie Moniz Hardy) A retired private school principal has backed government plans to upend the public education system – but said the project needed to be backed by good resources and […]]]>

Updated: January 26, 2022 07:54

Susan Moench has retired from Mount Saint Agnes Academy after 14 years as principal of the school (Photograph by Jessie Moniz Hardy)

A retired private school principal has backed government plans to upend the public education system – but said the project needed to be backed by good resources and teacher training.

Sue Moench, who retired from Mount St Agnes Academy, a Catholic secondary school, last August, said: “Reforms to the public education system are well defined and have the potential to position our Bermudian students favorably in terms of career and future goals.

“Implementing the reforms will require a commitment to change, investment in resources, professional development for teachers and improved facilities.

Ms Moench, a teacher for 41 years, said the public and private sectors both had their pros and cons.

But she added: ‘The key factor is ensuring that our Bermudian children have the same opportunity to get a quality education.

Ms Moench said: “Children are our most precious resource – they are our future. We must provide them with an environment that supports their success and meets their individual learning needs, whatever they may be.

“As educators, we need to nurture in our students a desire to be critical thinkers, analytical people, and decision-makers so that they can meet the challenges presented to them in our ever-changing world.

“Students must prepare to become successful citizens, parents, employees, innovators and leaders of the 21st century. »

She said the pandemic, which had forced creative solutions to solve problems quickly, had underscored the need to foster adaptability in students.

Former MSA principal Sue Moench with students (Photograph provided)

Ms. Moench added, “Students need to learn from their experiences so they can access information to solve real-world problems.

“The rapid transition to remote learning has changed the classroom forever. Access to technology is no longer a luxury, but a requirement. The future of learning is beyond the classroom of class.

“Students need to have experiences that inspire them to take risks and seize opportunities. The role of the teacher must also adapt to respond to the changes experienced in the classroom “anywhere/anytime”.

Ms. Moench spent 14 years at the helm of MSA, the school she attended before leaving in 1972 to attend university in Nova Scotia, Canada.

She said one of her proudest accomplishments was adopting an internationally-approved curriculum at MSA in 2009 and leading the school through the process.

The school established a relationship with Alberta Education in Canada with the goal of becoming an Alberta Accredited International School, which was achieved in 2013.

Sue Moench has her head shaved to raise money for cancer research for the Terry Fox Foundation. Her husband Ken Moench, left, died of cancer in 2007. (Photograph provided)

Ms Moench added: “This process involved working with teachers to learn about the new curriculum and adapt to change, educating parents about the benefits of the program and engaging students to adapt to new learning and learning strategies. ‘education.”

She said, “It gives me great satisfaction to know that our MSA students are earning an internationally accredited high school diploma and entering the post-secondary programs of their choice, whether at college, university or on the work market. They are prepared and ready for their journey to the next stage of their life.

Ms Moench said the later stages of her career had involved the major challenge of coping with the coronavirus crisis.

She admitted: “Certainly the pandemic and a school’s transition to remote learning within 24 hours is the biggest recent and most notable challenge.”

Ms Moench said she plans to spend more time reading for pleasure, enjoying the outdoors, completing her travel list and learning new trades in retirement.

She added: “I have always loved working with children, so in the future I will continue to pursue opportunities that make a difference in the lives of children and young people.”

Ms. Moench graduated in 1976 from Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax with degrees in business and education.

She taught business at a post-secondary vocational school and pursued a master’s degree in vocational education and school administration at the University of Alberta, Canada.

Ms. Moench became the vice-principal of a junior high school in 1992, then a junior/senior high school.

Her first principalship was at Medicine Hat High School in Alberta in 1997.

Ms. Moench returned to Bermuda after the death of her husband Ken in 2007 and was appointed Director of MSA the same year.

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LETTER: ‘The time has come to elevate our public school facilities,’ says Hoboken administrator BOE https://fpru.org/letter-the-time-has-come-to-elevate-our-public-school-facilities-says-hoboken-administrator-boe/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 15:40:37 +0000 https://fpru.org/letter-the-time-has-come-to-elevate-our-public-school-facilities-says-hoboken-administrator-boe/ In a letter to the editor, Alex De La Torre, trustee of the Hoboken Board of Education, shares his personal perspective on why he will support the $241 million school referendum. Hoboken Board of Education Alex De La Torre. Facebook picture. Dear Editor, My name is Alejandro De La Torre, Jr. and I have lived […]]]>

In a letter to the editor, Alex De La Torre, trustee of the Hoboken Board of Education, shares his personal perspective on why he will support the $241 million school referendum.

Hoboken Board of Education Alex De La Torre. Facebook picture.

Dear Editor,

My name is Alejandro De La Torre, Jr. and I have lived in Hoboken for 15 years.

In 2007, my wife, our 3 month old daughter and I were transplanted from Southern California and, like so many others, we fell in love with this community. Two years later, girl number two graced us with her presence.

I remember many times my wife and I debated the pros and cons of coming home versus staying in Hoboken. We were faced with the inevitable question that so many other parents have asked themselves: “Do we stay or do we go?”

Our conversations touched on all the same topics that many continue to weigh in on today – a bigger home, more space for the kids, a variety of sports opportunities for young people, better schools.

It was an easy decision. It’s too special of a place; its walkability, diversity, proximity to New York City, and most importantly, the kinship we felt with the community far exceeded anything the suburbs had to offer. Hoboken all the way!

My wife and I are both products of public schools and we strongly believe that they are an important fiber in the community. We engaged and enrolled our children in the Hoboken Public School District beginning with pre-K.

This commitment has paid off! My daughters have been surrounded by wonderful educators, overcome academic challenges, our youngest daughter continues to benefit from the special education program, and just as importantly, they go home happy!

However, as great as the public school experience has been so far, the one area that has lagged is facilities. As proud as we are of our city, we have failed to invest in the area where we, as a community, benefit immensely – our schools.

Over the past 12 years, our family has experienced a growing school population. As elementary school children, our children were constantly moving between Brandt and Wallace due to increasing demand.

As Hoboken Middle School students, they had to have lunch at 10:30 a.m. because there was no room in the cafeteria. Now, our freshman at Hoboken High School lacks the modern facilities that other students take for granted in New Jersey.

I strongly believe that every child, regardless of socio-economic status, deserves and is entitled to an enriching educational experience. Improved facilities throughout the district will provide additional exposure, opportunity and preparation for all students.

Some of them include:

– Eight scientific laboratories
– Culinary arts kitchen, classroom and cafe
– Collaborative Learning Activity Center (Library Media Center)
– Life and Transition Skills Room
– Six special education classrooms
– Weight room, auxiliary gymnasium, regulation size swimming pool

For too long, the needs of our public school facilities have been sidelined or treated with the proverbial ‘band-aids’, while other local schools have been updated and modernized.

The long-term facilities plan we are voting on this Tuesday, January 25 meets many district and community needs. We can create a fourth primary school, while allowing the current population of Demarest to move into a building suitable for middle school students.

Additionally, the referendum creates a new secondary school with the facilities and amenities – academic, vocational and athletic – that will allow students to be competitive and prepared for the 21st century.

Despite the current lack of resources, our students are extraordinarily resilient:

$17.5 million in total scholarships in 2021, $1.8 million in 2015
94.5% average cohort graduation rate over 4 years for the Class of 2018 to the Class of 2021
Average upperclass college and university acceptance rate of 94.0% for the class of 2018 to the class of 2021
· Hoboken High Valedictorians over the past four years: NYU (’18), University of Calgary (’19), Vanderbilt (’20), Yale (’21)
· Award-winning theatrical program and debate teams
19 different sports programs including college: swimming, volleyball, soccer, lacrosse, wrestling

Now is the time to elevate our public school facilities. The New Jersey Department of Education has fully approved the district plan, interest rates are rock bottom, and there is no need to buy the one thing that is so scarce in Hoboken: land.

With the full support of the community, imagine the possibilities for the neighborhood. As residents, we share an undeniable love for our city and its rich history.

Now is the time to invest in future generations of Hoboken. I firmly believe that engagement begins with a YES vote on Tuesday, January 25.

Editor’s Note: Although the author of this letter, Alejandro De La Torre, Jr., is a member of the Hoboken Board of Education, the letter expresses only the personal views of Mr. De La Torres and does not not been authorized by or written on behalf of the Board of Education.

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Sports Day Organized at Delhi Public School in Nashik for Grades 1 and 2 Students | Aurangabad News https://fpru.org/sports-day-organized-at-delhi-public-school-in-nashik-for-grades-1-and-2-students-aurangabad-news/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/sports-day-organized-at-delhi-public-school-in-nashik-for-grades-1-and-2-students-aurangabad-news/ Public Delhi School, Nashik, organized daily sports for Standard 1 and 2 students, who participated in the event with great fervor. The pitch was filled with joy, merriment and excitement as various events unfolded. The winners received medals and certificates. St Xavier School student shines in skating event Avani Daryani, a 6-year-old preparatory class student […]]]>


Public Delhi School, Nashik, organized daily sports for Standard 1 and 2 students, who participated in the event with great fervor. The pitch was filled with joy, merriment and excitement as various events unfolded. The winners received medals and certificates.
St Xavier School student shines in skating event
Avani Daryani, a 6-year-old preparatory class student from St Xavier’s School, Nashik Road, won 2 medals – one silver and one bronze – at the State Roller Skating Championship hosted by the Skating Association of Maharashtra. She is now eligible to compete in the National Roller Skating Championship.
“Fit India Week” at Podar International School
The Podar International School, Deolali, organized a “Fit India Week” to raise awareness about fitness and various physical activities. Activities included dancing, aerobics, yoga, zumba and cricket.
The motive behind this event is to move towards a more physically active lifestyle. The school also organized a “Podar has talent” competition. All the students participated in the program with great enthusiasm and passion. They displayed a talent that involved math tricks, dancing, drawing, mimicry, cooking, and presentation skills. The winners received certificates.
Fravashi Academy
celebrates the “red day”
Preschoolers from Fravashi Academy virtually celebrated “Red Day”. It was a wonderful learning activity that helped the children understand the concept of primary colors. The students and the teacher were dressed in red.
Saint-Laurent organizes a speech competition
Students from the elementary section of St. Lawrence High School and College took part in an intra-class speech competition. They spoke confidently on various topics and were assessed on various criteria such as diction, expression, etc. The main motto of this competition was to instill confidence in students and provide them with a platform to express their views and opinions while honing their oratory skills.
Workshop by award-winning photojournalist Padma Shri
Padma Shri recipient photojournalist Sudharak Olwe recently organized an orientation workshop and an exhibition of her photographs for the benefit of young people. The event, which was organized with the support of the MGM University School of Photography, also saw an interactive session.
ARDC meeting to be held at Parbhani University
Vasantrao Naik Marathwada Agricultural University, Parbhani, in association with the Maharashtra Agricultural Education and Research Council, Pune, will jointly organize the 49th Meeting of the Agricultural Research and Development Committee (ARDC) from December 24-30 .
A total of 220 recommendations from the 4 universities will be presented during the meeting. The event will be opened by the Minister of Agriculture of Maharashtra, Dadaji Bhuse.
MIT Student Integration Program
The student integration program was conducted at the Maharashtra Institute of Technology (MIT).
“The main objective of the event was to welcome new first year BTech students and familiarize them with the different university facilities,” said Santosh Bhosle, director of MIT. Prominent figures from local industries guided the students on occasion.


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Sports Day Organized at Delhi Public School in Nashik for Grades 1 and 2 Students | Nashik News https://fpru.org/sports-day-organized-at-delhi-public-school-in-nashik-for-grades-1-and-2-students-nashik-news/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 22:56:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/sports-day-organized-at-delhi-public-school-in-nashik-for-grades-1-and-2-students-nashik-news/ Public Delhi School, Nashik, organized daily sports for Standard 1 and 2 students, who participated in the event with great fervor. The pitch was filled with joy, merriment and excitement as various events unfolded. The winners received medals and certificates. St Xavier School student shines in skating event Avani Daryani, a 6-year-old preparatory class student […]]]>


Public Delhi School, Nashik, organized daily sports for Standard 1 and 2 students, who participated in the event with great fervor. The pitch was filled with joy, merriment and excitement as various events unfolded. The winners received medals and certificates.
St Xavier School student shines in skating event
Avani Daryani, a 6-year-old preparatory class student from St Xavier’s School, Nashik Road, won 2 medals – one silver and one bronze – at the State Roller Skating Championship hosted by the Skating Association of Maharashtra. She is now eligible to compete in the National Roller Skating Championship.
“Fit India Week” at Podar International School
The Podar International School, Deolali, organized a “Fit India Week” to raise awareness about fitness and various physical activities. Activities included dancing, aerobics, yoga, zumba and cricket.
The motive behind this event is to move towards a more physically active lifestyle. The school also organized a “Podar has talent” competition. All the students participated in the program with great enthusiasm and passion. They displayed a talent that involved math tricks, dancing, drawing, mimicry, cooking, and presentation skills. The winners received certificates.
Fravashi Academy
celebrates the “red day”
Preschoolers from Fravashi Academy virtually celebrated “Red Day”. It was a wonderful learning activity that helped the children understand the concept of primary colors. The students and the teacher were dressed in red.
Saint-Laurent organizes a speech competition
Students from the elementary section of St. Lawrence High School and College took part in an intra-class speech competition. They spoke confidently on various topics and were assessed on various criteria such as diction, expression, etc. The main motto of this competition was to instill confidence in students and provide them with a platform to express their views and opinions while honing their oratory skills.
Workshop by award-winning photojournalist Padma Shri
Padma Shri recipient photojournalist Sudharak Olwe recently organized an orientation workshop and an exhibition of her photographs for the benefit of young people. The event, which was organized with the support of the MGM University School of Photography, also saw an interactive session.
ARDC meeting to be held at Parbhani University
Vasantrao Naik Marathwada Agricultural University, Parbhani, in association with the Maharashtra Agricultural Education and Research Council, Pune, will jointly organize the 49th Meeting of the Agricultural Research and Development Committee (ARDC) from December 24-30 .
A total of 220 recommendations from the 4 universities will be presented during the meeting. The event will be opened by the Minister of Agriculture of Maharashtra, Dadaji Bhuse.
MIT Student Integration Program
The student integration program was conducted at the Maharashtra Institute of Technology (MIT).
“The main objective of the event was to welcome new first year BTech students and familiarize them with the different university facilities,” said Santosh Bhosle, director of MIT. Prominent figures from local industries guided the students on occasion.


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Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) https://fpru.org/institute-of-engineering-and-technology-iet/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 14:06:03 +0000 https://fpru.org/institute-of-engineering-and-technology-iet/ December 16, 2021 Less than half of new engineering hires have the technical or soft skills needed to work in the industry, a new Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) skills survey reveals, raising concerns that “the crisis skills in the UK will continue to grow unless government and industry take action ‘. The impact […]]]>


December 16, 2021

Less than half of new engineering hires have the technical or soft skills needed to work in the industry, a new Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) skills survey reveals, raising concerns that “the crisis skills in the UK will continue to grow unless government and industry take action ‘.

The impact of missing skills means that 45% of companies that see a skills shortage among young people offer additional training to apprentices / graduates who are new to the industry, while a quarter simply recruit fewer apprentices and graduates. graduates (25%). Two-thirds (71%) of the UK engineering workforce who experience internal skills gaps say it is due to lack of engineering or technical skills.

Almost all (96%) engineering employers who identified a skills shortage among general applicants say that this skills shortage has an impact on their business in one way or another. The most common impacts of a skills shortage among applicants are around the recruitment path – either causing recruitment difficulties (50%) or lengthening recruitment times (47%).

A lack of recruiting from a diverse talent pool may also fuel the problem, with only a third of companies taking action to improve the diversity of their workforce by gender (33%) or origin. ethnic (30%).

When asked what support businesses need from government to improve their skills nationwide, more funding for apprenticeships came out on top (54%), with more support for training or get retraining in priority areas (51%) and better career advice and guidance in schools and colleges (49%) following online.

Simon Edwards, Director of Governance and External Engagement at the IET, said: “Over the past 12 months, the UK has continued to experience economic uncertainty, supported by Brexit and the Covid pandemic -19. This, coupled with the drive to achieve the UK’s net zero targets and the emergence of new roles in engineering companies with a shift in the skill set required, means that we are seeing a gap of sustainable skills that will continue to grow unless government and industry take action.

“Workers are in high demand, but we don’t have readily available recruits with the right skills to fill the job market – which we have been reporting through the Skills Survey for 15 years. Frustratingly, nothing has changed. In addition, this year, employers in the engineering sector are reporting a general shortage of candidates for positions, leading to more difficulties in recruiting (34%) – a marked increase from 2020 (22%). UK engineering companies must now seek to improve profitability and productivity with fewer staff than before.

“We are urging more companies to provide work experience opportunities for young people to help roll out T-levels and further learnings. Addressing this skills crisis requires a deeper engagement between government, employers and the education system to produce a talent pool that can support a thriving UK economy. The IET has already started engaging with government calling for the integration of engineering into existing science, technology and math learning in elementary school.

The impact of the pandemic on staff recruitment and skills was immediate, with more than half (55%) having to deal with staff members sick or isolating themselves from Covid-19. Nonetheless, companies remain optimistic about the future, confident in the economic outlook for their business (79%) and their industry (77%).

As the economy changes, so do business priorities. While 12 months ago the top priority was to reduce costs (44%), now the top priorities are focused on improving profitability (67%) and productivity (62%).

However, one of the long-term impacts of the pandemic has to do with skills. Three in ten have experienced a downsizing in the past 12 months (31%) and half attribute this directly to Covid-19 (52%).

Looking ahead to the next five years, engineering employers recognize particular skill areas as important to the growth of their organization. However, whether or not they have these skills in the workforce varies widely. Design and manufacturing is recognized as a key area by 36% of respondents and most (64%) have the skills they think they need. However, energy and environmental sustainability is the second most cited area of ​​growth (35%) and only half (51%) have the skills they need.

In light of this skills gap, it’s no surprise that only half (50%) believe it is possible for their organization to be net zero by 2050, in line with the UK target.

This is the fifteenth year that the EIT has published its skills assessment. The fieldwork was conducted online with 1,039 engineering and technology employers across the UK between August 6 and September 2, 2021 by market research agency YouGov. The last skills survey with comparative data was carried out in 2020.

The IET Industry Skills and Demand 2021 report is available on the EIT website.


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Students and teachers at Pinellas Public School will soon ride the PSTA buses for free https://fpru.org/students-and-teachers-at-pinellas-public-school-will-soon-ride-the-psta-buses-for-free/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 16:01:36 +0000 https://fpru.org/students-and-teachers-at-pinellas-public-school-will-soon-ride-the-psta-buses-for-free/ It’s about to get easier and cheaper for thousands of Pinellas County students, teachers, and staff to take the bus. Starting in January, all Pinellas County School District students, teachers and staff will be able to ride all Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority buses free of charge. And when the 2022-2023 school year begins next August, […]]]>


It’s about to get easier and cheaper for thousands of Pinellas County students, teachers, and staff to take the bus.

Starting in January, all Pinellas County School District students, teachers and staff will be able to ride all Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority buses free of charge. And when the 2022-2023 school year begins next August, some students at three Pinellas high schools will be assigned to PSTA buses rather than yellow school buses.

The PSTA board approved the new programs and the Pinellas County School Board voted unanimously in favor on Tuesday. They reflect the partnerships between public bus systems and local school districts in many other cities, and they will provide many benefits immediately and beyond.

Brad miller [ Provided ]

From January 1, students, teachers and staff in Pinellas County can take PSTA buses for free by simply showing their school ID card to the bus driver. They can ride for free seven days a week, and they can ride anywhere, anytime. They can take the bus to jobs, sporting events, or extracurricular activities. Or at the cinema, shopping malls or the beaches. They can take the 100X or 300X routes. They can ride anywhere in the county for any reason. Free.

In the short term, the free rides should come in handy for families looking for an inexpensive way to get around Pinellas without depending on a car. We are convinced that this will spread. The number of PSTA riders increased when we offered free rides to students, faculty and staff at St. Petersburg College and the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg.

In the long run, there should be even more benefits for the whole community. Young people who try public transit now will be more likely to use it later as they age and enter the workforce. More passengers will help PSTA advocate for a more robust transit system with shorter wait times between buses and with more routes. And a stronger public transport system will help reduce the carbon footprint, reduce traffic, and make Pinellas even more attractive to new residents and businesses.

The other element of this initiative is to experiment by assigning some high school students to travel to school by PSTA buses instead of the yellow buses operated by the school district. It will begin next August with students from Dunedin High School, Largo High School and Gibbs High School in St. Petersburg living close to existing PSTA routes. The schedule of some buses will be adjusted to better match the start and end times of school. PSTA bus drivers on these routes will receive training from the school district. This partnership is particularly important now, as it will help address the pandemic-induced shortage of school bus drivers.

Using public buses instead of school buses to bring children to and from school is common practice in many cities. If the experiment is successful, we can extend it to other high schools in the years to come.

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Free PSTA bus rides now will pay big dividends down the road for the whole community.

Brad Miller is the Managing Director of the Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority.


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“Modern institution or madrassa” – Sir Syed’s fight for the Muslim University of Aligarh https://fpru.org/modern-institution-or-madrassa-sir-syeds-fight-for-the-muslim-university-of-aligarh/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 06:40:06 +0000 https://fpru.org/modern-institution-or-madrassa-sir-syeds-fight-for-the-muslim-university-of-aligarh/ Aligarh Muslim University Archive Photo | Communal room Text size: A- A + IIf you walk down the tree-lined road from Bab-e-Syed on the southern outskirts of AMU to Centenary Gate at the northern edge of the university, you may encounter many bearded young men dressed in sherwani. It’s not that sherwani or beards are […]]]>


Aligarh Muslim University Archive Photo | Communal room

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IIf you walk down the tree-lined road from Bab-e-Syed on the southern outskirts of AMU to Centenary Gate at the northern edge of the university, you may encounter many bearded young men dressed in sherwani. It’s not that sherwani or beards are a new fad on campus. They have always been there. In fact, the Aligarh men’s white cut sherwani and churidar have been a kind of uniform for formal occasions for centuries here. But in some quarters, the opinion is that they are more visible due to an increasing number of madrassa students joining classes at AMU. Many first-time visitors may mistake the campus for an advanced madrassa. Maulvis, who has already acquired some knowledge of Islamic religious texts, enters traditional secular courses through a provision in the 1981 Aligarh Muslim University Act (Amendment). promotion of Muslims in India ”. A committee headed by a former pro-VC, Professor Mohammed Shafi, was set up in 1986 to recommend measures for the implementation of this section. Among other things, the Shafi Committee suggested that a center be established to carry out the mandate of the Law. The Center for the Promotion of Educational and Cultural Advancement of Muslims in India (CPECAMI) was thus established in 1988. It is under the same section 5 (2) C that the Center for the Promotion of science was established in 1985.

Its main objective was to sensitize Muslims to the need for acquiring scientific knowledge and to promote science education in educational institutions run by Muslims, including madrasas. So how did AMU, a modern institution for which founder Sir Syed faced strong opposition from the maulvis in the last quarter of the 19th century, became a magnet for madrassa students? ? Many on campus hold two former vice-chancellors – Saiyid Hamid and Lieutenant-General (retired) Zameer Uddin Shah – responsible for opening the doors of AMU wide to the maulvis.

Saiyid Hamid was a former AMU student and a retired civil servant. His tenure as VC (1980-1985) saw huge protests from students, one of whom was even killed in police gunfire during a demonstration. But Hamid also introduced many changes. Farrukh Waris, a former AMU student and family friend of Saiyid Hamid, recalls an interesting anecdote about him. She says that when the campaign against Saiyid Hamid became fierce and he too got impatient and wanted to step down, he contacted then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi. Farrukh Waris says:

‘Indira Gandhi told Saiyid Hamid that ek Syed born AMU qayam kiya aur doosre Syed ko AMU ko bachana hai (One Syed, i.e. Sir Syed, founded AMU and another Syed, or Saiyid Hamid, had to save him). And Saiyid Hamid spared no effort to not only prevent the university from going to dogs, but he also improved his stature.


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As an educator, Saiyid Hamid was truly saddened by the educational backwardness of Muslims. He wanted reforms in madrassa education. Since some of the major madrassas in northern India, such as Darul Uloom in Deoband, Uttar Pradesh, have not sought government support, they have also resisted the introduction of modern subjects into their curricula. . Educators like Saiyid Hamid were in favor of the idea that diplomas issued by some of the main madrassas should be recognized by AMU to allow them admission. The students of Deoband, Nadwatul Ulema, Lucknow and a few other madrassas have found their way into the “bastion of modernity”.

In the same way that all AMU pass-outs are called Aligs, the products of these madrassas bear the name of their institution as a badge of honor. So, a Deoband product is called a Qasmi, because Qasim Nanautvi (1833-1880) was one of the main founders of Darul Uloom Deoband. A graduate of Nadwatul Ulema in Lucknow is called Nadwi. Ariful Islam, a retired professor of statistics at AMU, has been observing the “infiltration” of madrassa students into AMU for some time. “I too am for the reforms in the teaching of madrasas. But instead of modernizing the madrassas, they are turning a modern institution like AMU into a madrassa, ”he says. He holds Saiyid Hamid responsible for giving an opening to madrassa students, which led to the opening of the floodgates for the maulvis to occupy this first modern educational institution.

If Saiyid Hamid gave a small opening to the madrassa students at AMU, Zameer Uddin Shah, vice-chancellor from 2012-2017, opened the floodgates to let in the maulvis. As part of CPECAMI, he introduced a one-year bridging course for madrassa students. The bridging course has an intake of 100 students, seventy-five boys and twenty-five girls. During the course, they learn English, humanities, law and information technology. Upon successful completion of this course, students receive certificates equivalent to the Twelfth Standard Certificate of Completion at a Standard School.


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After a fifteen-year struggle, the 1981 Aligarh Muslim University (Amendment) Act was passed. Overall, it responds to the aspirations of Indian Muslims, defining the university as “the educational institution of their choice established by Muslims in India, originally Muhammadan Anglo-Oriental College, Aligarh and which was later incorporated under the name of Aligarh Muslim University ‘. No other law in the past has conferred the kind of powers on AMU that this law has. It sees the Muslims of India as a unified body, and the University Tribunal, which has become the supreme body of government, represents the entire Muslim population of India. Those who fought for AMU status across India in the 1920s must have smiled from above when the AMU (Amendment) Act, 1981, stated in Section 5 (2) C , that he “empowered the University to promote in particular the educational and cultural advancement of Muslims in India.”

AMU may have opened its off-campus centers, but the main campus needs to get back on its feet. It must maintain its reputation as a modern and progressive institution committed to training young people capable of sustaining rational and scientific thought. Sir Syed, argues Asghar Abbas, could easily have established a large madrassa if he wanted to. He struggled to instill new thinking, a rational and scientific disposition, among Muslims. He was opposed by traditional clerics because he challenged many established ideas and values. “I am saddened that they are turning a modern institution into a sort of madrassa with a great infrastructure. We will not do Sir Syed’s legacy and memories justice if AMU ends up becoming a madrassa, even though officially it is a university, ”Abbas said. Some people on campus are also worried about a new phenomenon, the growing fault lines due to bigotry. Although Shiites and Sunnis pray here and have different prayer times, some students and teachers are increasingly avoiding congregations in the huge Jama Masjid at AMU.

On another occasion, the former PRO and Director of the Urdu Academy at AMU, Rahat Abrar, was asked to investigate a commotion in part of the school’s students for visually impaired students. Abrar found out that a group of boys wanted to come out of the hostel campus and pray in a Sunni mosque in the market because the imam of the mosque on the school premises was a Deobandi. The campus had been cleansed of such narrow sectarian sentiments earlier. Incidents like these undermine the ideals and values ​​that Sir Syed stood for. He had dreamed of founding an institution where Hindus would not be forced to observe Muslim religious practices, while Muslims were to keep their bigotry aside and put their hearts and minds to develop into a healthy and self-reliant community.

This excerpt from “Aligarh Muslim University: The Making of the Modern Indian Muslim” by Mohammed Wajihuddin was published with the permission of HarperCollins India.

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