high school – FPRU http://fpru.org/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 20:29:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fpru.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon-1-150x150.png high school – FPRU http://fpru.org/ 32 32 PHS Named Outstanding Public School Art Department | Education Subscription Offer https://fpru.org/phs-named-outstanding-public-school-art-department-education-subscription-offer/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 20:29:07 +0000 https://fpru.org/phs-named-outstanding-public-school-art-department-education-subscription-offer/ PAOLA — Deanna Morgan and the Paola High School Art Department received the Mary Ann Grimes Next Generation Travel Trophy during a celebration of local high school artists at Town Square Event Design on Wednesday, March 2. Mary Ann Grimes was on hand for the award presentation and traveling trophy for the Next Generation 2022 […]]]>

PAOLA — Deanna Morgan and the Paola High School Art Department received the Mary Ann Grimes Next Generation Travel Trophy during a celebration of local high school artists at Town Square Event Design on Wednesday, March 2.

Mary Ann Grimes was on hand for the award presentation and traveling trophy for the Next Generation 2022 art exhibition “Explorations” presented at the Reflections Art Gallery located at the Miami County Medical Center.

Morgan and Paola’s Art Department received the Traveling Trophy and a $500 check for being selected for Outstanding Public School Art Department.

Miami County Art Students submitted 53 works of art. Karen Gerety Folk, curator of the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art located in Johnson County, volunteered her time to serve as a juror. Folk has selected 20 pieces to display at the Reflections art gallery for the “Explorations” art exhibition from January 2 to March 2.

“Wreck,” a play by Paola High School student Elsie Fleming, was named Best Show by Folk. Fleming received a $250 cash prize from the Miami County Arts Coalition.

“I had just moved to a new school when I created this piece,” Fleming said. “It reflects the inner conflict I experienced as I deciphered the many emotions I felt in the face of change.

“I felt detached from myself as I tried to figure out who I was in this new environment,” she said. “The oil pastel I felt reflected the mess, or wreckage, I felt at the time.”

The ‘Explorations’ art exhibition featured works by Paola’s students: Elsie Fleming, Luke Faunce, Emma Bishop, Kali Hickman and Emily Weigell; Spring Hill students: Samantha Winebrenner, Halle Williams, Lilly Yoder, Ashlyn Lake, Katlyn Kimmi, Ruby Dickie, Kastin Galloway, Madison Stults, and Kael Knittel; and Louisbourg students: Mariya Kasych, Jillian Staver, Jordan Mynsted, Sophie Sommers and Garrett Poe.

Grimes is one of the founders of the Miami County Art Coalition. She is the first curator of the Explorations exhibit and continues to inspire participation in the Coalition’s Next Generation Student Art Exhibit. As a former public school educator, Grimes reminds everyone of the importance of art programs in public schools.

Rollin Karg created the traveling trophy. He became an engineer who became a photographer, became a potter, became a cabinetmaker, became a glassblower. Karg studied hot glass at Emporia State University.

The trophy is a rare combination of four hand-blown glass globes that reflect the light seen in high school art departments and student talent.

Spring Hill won the first Outstanding Public School Art Department award in 2019. The show did not take place in 2020 due to COVID-19.

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VYPE 2022 Baseball Preview: Public School Sleepers https://fpru.org/vype-2022-baseball-preview-public-school-sleepers/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 07:45:48 +0000 https://fpru.org/vype-2022-baseball-preview-public-school-sleepers/ Welcome to the 2022 baseball season. The season kicked off this week with out-of-district games starting across the city. VYPE screened 22 public school teams around the city. Let’s take some flyers here. Santa Fe had a magical run a few years ago and Kingwood has had flashes of greatness over the past few decades. […]]]>

Welcome to the 2022 baseball season.

The season kicked off this week with out-of-district games starting across the city. VYPE screened 22 public school teams around the city.

Let’s take some flyers here. Santa Fe had a magical run a few years ago and Kingwood has had flashes of greatness over the past few decades. Alvin has a new skipper, who could change the color of the program. Here are the Sleepers in 2022.

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SANTA FE INDIANS

Coach Ronnie Wulf is another pillar of the Greater Houston baseball coaching fraternity. Wulf has worked there for more than 30 years and has more than 530 victories to his credit. Santa Fe fell to State Champ Barbers Hill in regional quarters, but brought back some serious firepower. The strength of the Indians is in the middle. Jacob Cyr (St. Thomas) is the ace, going 8-1 with a sub-2.00 ERA in 2021. He was on the first team and teammate Rhett Ostermayer was on the second team. Ashton Lozano will play shortstop and in center field is Newcomer of the Year Kyeler Thompson. On the corners will be Brandon Vassallo (Texas Lutheran) at third and Brice Smith at first base. Vassallo was also 6-1 on the mound. Santa Fe will chase Friendswood for the district title.

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KINGWOOD MUSTANG

“Protect the K” is Coach Kelly Mead’s motto this season, as he’s been around East Houston for nearly two decades at Huffman and Kingwood. He knows the talent and how to get the best out of his players. Last season, Kingwood made his sixth straight playoff appearance going 24-10 overall and 9-3 in district play. The ‘Stangs will play seven straight on the arm of Ryan McClish (Bossier Parish JC), who was 9-1 last season and a first-team member. Josh Hebert (Texas State) and Josh Pelfrey will also help on the mound, while Ashton Rodriguez, Paxton Singleton and Braelon Richardson (South Alabama) will produce runs on offense. Also watch for Jack Bruckbauer as a utility star for the ‘Stangs. “To be successful, we have to buy in, grow as a team and be consistent,” Mead said. They will chase Atascocita for the district title.

SUMMER STREAM BULLDOGS

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Don’t sleep on Summer Creek. Coach DJ Wilson’s team has made the playoffs six years in a row and brings back seven senior starters. Midfield is important with second baseman Ahmar Donatto (PVAMU-signed) and first-team shortstop Jayden Duplantier (Texas-signed). Summer Creek fires first-team pitcher Adam Troy, who will be the ace. He signed with Pepperdine. The outfield is athletic with first teams Erick Arcay and Bryan DeShazier-Miles, and Diego Arcay. Ayden Bell is solid behind the plate and Aaron Hernandez is a hard-hitting corner infielder. Nico Young and Drew Mausy will also be big contributors in 2022. Atascocita and Kingwood will be the targets in the District 21-6A game before the playoffs begin.

SHADOW CREEK SHARKS

The Shadow Creek Sharks are under new management this season as Jose Guerra takes over the program. The Sharks had a great year in 2021, finishing second in the district 23-6A and advancing to the regional quarters. What will they do for an encore? Well, they’re going to need throwing for starters to get past Strake Jesuit, Pearland, and Alvin. They do have some basics, though, with the return of outfielders Tre Broussard and DeJuan Lewis. Broussard was an honorable mention, all-state pick, while Lewis signed to play football and baseball at Prairie View A&M. Juan Guzman will be the hot corner man. Hopefully Coach Guerra can keep up the momentum from last year and build on the success of the Sharks.

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ALVIN YELLOW JACKETS

Well, well, look who landed at Alvin High. None other than Anthony Scalise, who led Pearland to two state tournament appearances, left to volunteer as a coach at Rice University and led Shadow Creek to a historic season a year ago. The Yellowjackets have talent and won the district 23-6A last year before retiring to North Shore in the regional round. Scalise has 239 wins as a high school coach and knows the closet isn’t empty. Back in the dugout, newcomer of the year Cooper Williams pitches and plays on the pitch. He is only a second year student. Receiver Tanner Marek (Texas A&M-Corpus Christi) is a first-team returning receiver and his brother, Jack, will pick and play a corner position. All-district outfielder Connor Keithley is a terrific hitter and athlete on the field and on base. Grant Davis will flash the glove at shortstop. Beware of these jackets – they are ready to sting.

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STRATFORD SPARTANS

There is a Renaissance going on at Stratford High School. The Spartans have had a terrific football season and their basketball team is making noise. Let’s talk a bit about baseball as Keith Humphreys looks for a breakthrough season. Stratford made the playoffs and won a playoff series last season and are once again hosting decorated starters. Some might say the strength of your team has to be behind the plate. Bingo, Cameron Donley anchors the defense and has signed with Texas A&M. Brecken Minuet is a long shortstop and Luis Camargo and Luke Rives are defensively oriented in the outfield. Rives also plays football and had a record season as a receiver for the Spartans. Paxton Terveen should be the ace of the staff and can play a corner.

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Cabrini moves 7th and 8th graders to high school academy model – The News Herald https://fpru.org/cabrini-moves-7th-and-8th-graders-to-high-school-academy-model-the-news-herald/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 22:01:03 +0000 https://fpru.org/cabrini-moves-7th-and-8th-graders-to-high-school-academy-model-the-news-herald/ The new year has started with many positive changes at Cabrini School. A few weeks ago, Allen Park Catholic School announced a new administration, major renovations and a $1.3 million donation from the estate of longtime parishioners Don and Dolores King. In another startling announcement released late Friday afternoon, Reverend Timothy Birney, pastor of St. […]]]>

The new year has started with many positive changes at Cabrini School.

A few weeks ago, Allen Park Catholic School announced a new administration, major renovations and a $1.3 million donation from the estate of longtime parishioners Don and Dolores King.

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New Studies Show Charters Generate Gains for All Public School Children https://fpru.org/new-studies-show-charters-generate-gains-for-all-public-school-children/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 14:01:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/new-studies-show-charters-generate-gains-for-all-public-school-children/ Thirty years ago, when the charter school movement was just getting started, devotees of big-city school systems feared these new options would drain critical funds, hurt children left behind, and create a system in which race played a central role. but an often unrecognized role that is even more unfair. Yet in recent years it […]]]>

Thirty years ago, when the charter school movement was just getting started, devotees of big-city school systems feared these new options would drain critical funds, hurt children left behind, and create a system in which race played a central role. but an often unrecognized role that is even more unfair. Yet in recent years it has become increasingly clear that concerns about charter harms are misplaced — as demonstrated by a pair of new studies that find large and statistically significant gains for all students publicly enrolled in as charter schools expand.

If you’re familiar with charter school research, these results shouldn’t come as a surprise. After all, for the better part of a decade, a steady stream of studies has shown that enrollment in urban charters boosts academic achievement for low-income black and/or Hispanic students. For example, a 2015 CREDO analysis found that black students in poverty gained nearly nine weeks of English learning and nearly 12 weeks of math a year by attending an urban charter school instead of a school. traditional public.


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Other research has shown that the effects of charter schools on student achievement in neighboring district schools range from neutral to positive. For example, a recent review of the literature on this issue identified nine studies that found positive effects, three that found negative effects, and 10 that found no effects.

Put these two findings together – that urban charters boost their own students’ achievement and that they have a neutral to positive impact on children’s achievement in traditional public schools – and the logical implication is clear: the growth of schools in charter should drive overall success for students in a given community.

Yet, for complicated reasons related to data collection and accessibility, direct evidence is limited to a handful of studies. The first, a 2019 Fordham Institute report titled Rising Tide: Charter School Market Share and Student Success found a positive relationship between the percentage of black and Hispanic students enrolled in a district-level charter school and the average achievement of students in those groups—at least in larger urban districts. The second, by Douglas N. Harris and Feng Chen of Tulane University, found a positive relationship between the percentage of all students enrolled in charter schools and the average achievement of all publicly enrolled students, particularly in mathematics.

Now, those two studies — which include more than nine out of 10 U.S. school districts and nearly 20 years of charter school enrollment data — have been updated with additional years of data and estimates, and their conclusions begin to converge.

First, both studies find that the overall effects of charter schools are overwhelmingly positive. For example, according to the Tulane study, going from zero to over 10% enrollment in charter schools increases the school district’s average high school graduation rate by at least 3 points. percentage. Meanwhile, the Fordham study suggests that a jump from zero to 10% in charter school enrollment increases the math scores of all publicly enrolled students by at least one-tenth of a grade level. .

Second, both studies find that the growth of charter schools leads to larger and more consistent benefits in math than in reading. For example, according to the Tulane study, going from zero to more than 10 percent in charter school enrollment results in a 6 percentile increase in math scores and a 3 percentile increase in reading scores.

Third, both studies find that achievement gains are concentrated in large urban areas, consistent with much previous research on charter school performance. For example, according to the Tulane study, going from zero to more than 10 percent in charter enrollment share in the average school district is associated with a 0.13 standard deviation increase in math scores. But in metropolitan areas, this change is associated with a 0.21 standard deviation increase in match scores.

Finally, both studies find that poor, black, and Hispanic students see big gains. For example, according to the Fordham study, an increase from zero to 10 percent in charter school enrollment increases math scores for these children by about 0.25 grade levels. Poor students also see a 0.15 grade level increase in reading achievement.

These findings are extremely important, given long-standing concerns that the growth of charter schools would harm children in traditional public schools, and given the opposition charter schools still face in some places. To realize their potential, charter schools must be allowed to grow. But for that to happen, policymakers and the public need to understand what the best research on charters really says.

At a time when the whole country seems to be in a bad mood, here’s some good news: as charter schools grow and replicate, parents have access to high-quality schools that better meet the needs of their children, students who remain in traditional public schools are seeing better outcomes, and the racial and socioeconomic achievement gaps that have resisted many other well-meaning reforms are beginning to close.

In short, no one needs to take sides on this issue, because it really is a win-win.

Michael J. Petrilli is president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. David Griffith is associate research director and author of rising tide and Still on the rise studies.

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AG Rokita defends the right of the Catholic institution to uphold the Church’s doctrine on same-sex marriage https://fpru.org/ag-rokita-defends-the-right-of-the-catholic-institution-to-uphold-the-churchs-doctrine-on-same-sex-marriage/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 21:12:14 +0000 https://fpru.org/ag-rokita-defends-the-right-of-the-catholic-institution-to-uphold-the-churchs-doctrine-on-same-sex-marriage/ Attorney General Todd Rokita is defending religious freedom in a case involving the Indianapolis Archdiocese’s right to uphold church teachings on same-sex marriage in hiring and firing decisions. “Our founding fathers guaranteed religious freedom at the very beginning of the Bill of Rights,” Attorney General Rokita said. ” It is not a coincidence. Religious freedom […]]]>

Attorney General Todd Rokita is defending religious freedom in a case involving the Indianapolis Archdiocese’s right to uphold church teachings on same-sex marriage in hiring and firing decisions.

“Our founding fathers guaranteed religious freedom at the very beginning of the Bill of Rights,” Attorney General Rokita said. ” It is not a coincidence. Religious freedom is America’s first freedom. Here in Indiana, I will do everything in my power to protect that freedom for Hoosiers.

Attorney General Rokita filed an amicus brief on Friday supporting the archdiocese’s right to require Catholic schools under its jurisdiction to enforce a morality clause prohibiting employees from same-sex marriage. A teacher at Cathedral High School in Indianapolis has sued the archdiocese after he was fired following his marriage to another man.

Courts should not “allow litigation over whether and how the archdiocese can recognize Catholic schools,” Attorney General Rokita wrote in the brief. “The United States has a long tradition of preventing judicial entanglement in religious disputes – an entanglement that can only lead to interference with the autonomy of the Church.”

Last fall, Attorney General Rokita filed an amicus brief with the Indiana Court of Appeals supporting the archdiocese in the case. At this point, he is supporting the archdiocese in a motion to transfer the deliberation to the Indiana Supreme Court.

In a separate but very similar case, Attorney General Rokita in January led a 16-state coalition defending the right of Roncalli High School in Indianapolis to uphold Catholic doctrine on same-sex marriage.

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Maxwell AFB and DoDEA Reflect on Integrating Pioneer Public Schools in Alabama > Air Force > Article Display https://fpru.org/maxwell-afb-and-dodea-reflect-on-integrating-pioneer-public-schools-in-alabama-air-force-article-display/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 19:57:27 +0000 https://fpru.org/maxwell-afb-and-dodea-reflect-on-integrating-pioneer-public-schools-in-alabama-air-force-article-display/ MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Alabama (AFNS) — This year the Department of Defense Education Activity celebrates 75 years of military-related student education, engagement and empowerment. DoDEA is also proud of its history of advocating for justice and equality. Indeed, in 1963, Maxwell Air Force BaseMaxwell’s DoDEA school, Maxwell Elementary/Middle School, was […]]]>


This year the Department of Defense Education Activity celebrates 75 years of military-related student education, engagement and empowerment. DoDEA is also proud of its history of advocating for justice and equality.


Indeed, in 1963, Maxwell Air Force BaseMaxwell’s DoDEA school, Maxwell Elementary/Middle School, was one of only three integrated public schools in the state of Alabama.


“Maxwell was at the forefront of integrated public education in the South,” said Col. Eries Mentzer, commander of the 42nd Air Base Wing. “The DoDEA school was needed in 1963 to ensure Maxwell Airmen had the freedom to servethe ability to raise themselves to the best of their abilities knowing that, regardless of race, their military children had access to a high-quality, integrated public education.




 

Prior to the mid-1960s, black and white children in the South attended separate schools following the 1896 U.S. Supreme Court ruling. Plessy vs. Fergusonwho established the “separate but equal” doctrine used to justify racial segregation.


Maxwell Elementary School opened in 1938 as a kindergarten and high school for grades 1 through 3 for the children of officers and NCOs assigned to Maxwell Field. In 1940 an elementary school was built on Maxwell for grades 1-6. The base operated the school under the supervision of the Montgomery County School Board.


In March 1948, base management ceded control of Maxwell Elementary School to the Montgomery County School Board. The school board operated the school in accordance with contemporary Alabama laws; that is, like a separate school.


In 1954, the Supreme Court decision Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education knocked Plessy against Ferguson. As a result, the DoD announced that all schools at US military installations would operate in an integrated fashion.


However, the Montgomery County School Board superintendent refused to incorporate Maxwell’s new school facility, located right next to base property, saying it was a violation of the state’s Constitution. ‘Alabama. The language governing separate schooling remains unchanged in the Alabama Constitution today.


As a result, the U.S. government announced on March 16, 1963, that it would build an elementary school on Maxwell that would operate as a fully integrated school.


On September 3, 1963, the new Maxwell Elementary School opened with an initial enrollment of approximately 540 students, including the first black students. Maxwell Elementary School became the first school to integrate into Montgomery County; hiring the first black staff member, librarian Ms. Wilhelmina Baldwin of the Tuskegee Institute, in 1963.


Ten to fifteen black students attend the new integrated school. As part of the school integration process, racial distinction was not made on enrollment cards because, according to Principal Sorenson in 1963, “children are children.”


“It is helpful to understand how DoDEA, through its history, has contributed to the desegregation of education in America,” said Ms. Judith A. Minor, Director of Student Excellence, DoDEA Americas. “Our core values ​​of student focus, excellence, continuous improvement, diversity, individual potential, lifelong learning, shared responsibility and trust continue to inspire our mission. . We strive to advance the vision of “educational excellence for every student, every day, everywhere”.


Maxwell and DoDEA continue to work together to provide quality education to military-related students, regardless of race, ethnicity, color, or creed. Maxwell and DoDEA are further expanding educational opportunities by leading a DoD Pilot Program which allows children of active duty members who live off base to attend base school.


“We are incredibly proud of Maxwell’s role in breaking down barriers to service and promoting high-quality public education in Montgomery,” Mentzer said. “This is another great example of how Air Force Base Maxwell and the Air Force have impacted social justice in America. We thank DoDEA and our local, county, city, and state partners to unite with Maxwell to ensure that K-12 education serves as an opportunity rather than a challenge for Maxwell Airmen, Guardians and their families. By working together, we can secure freedom to serve, enabling our Airmen and Guardians to be the most ready to lead in today’s increasingly complex global security environment.



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American International College welcomes Hubert Benitez, DDS, PhD, as the institution’s twelfth president | News https://fpru.org/american-international-college-welcomes-hubert-benitez-dds-phd-as-the-institutions-twelfth-president-news/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/american-international-college-welcomes-hubert-benitez-dds-phd-as-the-institutions-twelfth-president-news/ SPRINGFIELD, Mass., February 18, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The American International College (AIC) Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Hubert Benitez, DDS, PhD, was unanimously chosen as the twelfth president of the 137-year-old institution. Benitez will succeed the president Vince Maniaci who is retiring after seventeen years of service. “We believe Dr. Benitez is […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD, Mass., February 18, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The American International College (AIC) Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Hubert Benitez, DDS, PhD, was unanimously chosen as the twelfth president of the 137-year-old institution. Benitez will succeed the president Vince Maniaci who is retiring after seventeen years of service.

“We believe Dr. Benitez is a leader who embraces the mission and strategic vision of American International College. Although times are tough for higher education, at the institution where Dr. Benitez previously served as president, he managed to expand enrollment and develop new programs, while improving the financial health and sustainability of the institution. establishment. He did so in a spirit of teamwork, ownership and accountability, and dedicated community outreach and engagement. As evidenced by his own career path, Dr. Benitez is an advocate for diversity, equity and inclusion. It is committed to providing access, opportunities and pathways for student success,” said the Chairman of the Board of Trustees. Frank Colaccino.

“I am extremely honored to have been chosen as AIC’s new president and I couldn’t be more excited to join an institution with such a rich history and a strong commitment to access and opportunity. I look forward to working with the faculty, staff, and students of AIC, as we consider together how to further impact the communities we serve. I am grateful for this opportunity and consider it the honor and privilege of my life,” Benitez said.

In his most recent position, Benitez served as vice president of strategic initiatives and academic innovation, and acting director of inclusion at Rockhurst University (Ruin Kansas City, Missouri. RU is a comprehensive institution of higher learning, offering educational programs to a diverse student body in the fields of business, communications, education, engineering, health, humanities, performing arts and visuals, science and mathematics. Among his responsibilities, Benitez had direct oversight of Strategic Planning, Institutional Effectiveness, Accreditation and Evaluation, Distance Education/eLearning, and the Prosperity Center for Financial Opportunity.

Prior to RockhurstBenitez served as President and CEO of St. Luke’s College of Health Sciences for nearly five years, where he provided visionary and strategic leadership that included the growth and diversification of the college’s academic portfolio; promote a culture of evaluation; increase the visibility of the institution through community presence, engagement and outreach efforts; engage in recruitment and enrollment management practices that have increased the college’s population while meeting the needs of a new and diverse demographic of students; and the implementation of a financial strategy that has enhanced the institution’s fiscal stability and prospects.

Benitez obtained his first doctorate in dental medicine from the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana in Latin America. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University University of Connecticut Health Sciences Center, later earning a doctorate in higher education administration from Saint Louis University College of Education and Public Service. Benitez is a graduate of the Institute of Educational Management (IEM) in Harvard University Graduate School of Educationand he completed the executive leadership program at the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business. Benitez has spent the past two decades in higher education as an academic and administrator, and fifteen years prior as a clinician.

A member of numerous past and present academic organizations, boards, and advisory committees, Benitez currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Kansas City; the board of directors of Cristo Rey Kansas City, a Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth High School; is a peer reviewer for the Middle States Commission on Higher Education; is a member of the Hispanic Advisory Committee for Kansas City Public schools; and is a member of the steering committee of KC Rising, a body of the KC Rising initiative, made up of businesses and community volunteers from around the Kansas City metropolitan region that engage in regional collaboration. Benitez’s professional associations include the President’s Alliance on Higher Education and Immigration, the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education, the American Dental Association, and the Golden Key International Honor Society, among others.

In addition to an extensive selection of published works, Benitez has been a guest lecturer in the United States and abroad and has received federally and privately funded research grants. Her work ethic and commitment have been recognized by Univision-Kansas City for her continued support of Hispanic heritage and by the Universidad Piloto de Colombia to forge international and interdisciplinary exchange programs. He was a recipient of the Hispanic Heritage Award and received special recognition for his service to the community through excellence in education. His contributions to Suffolk County of the Office of Minority Affairs were commended in addition to being selected as one of the Top 25 Latino Empowerment Advocates on Long Island, New York.

Benitez will join American International College to April 11, 2022.

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Founded in 1885, American International College (AIC) is a private, coeducational, doctoral-granting institution located in Springfield, MA, comprising the School of Business, Arts and Sciences, the School of Education and the School of Health Sciences. AIC supports and advances education, diversity, and opportunity for its students and the community.

Media Contact

Candy Whip, American International College413.205.3231, candy.lash@aic.edu

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THE SOURCE American International College

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State Recognizes Monterey High School Academy – Monterey Herald https://fpru.org/state-recognizes-monterey-high-school-academy-monterey-herald/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 22:48:34 +0000 https://fpru.org/state-recognizes-monterey-high-school-academy-monterey-herald/ The California Department of Education gives an exclusive nod to local programming. Monterey High School’s Sports Professions and Recreational Careers Academy has been named a 2022 California Partnership Academies Distinguished Academy. It is one of only three programs across the state to receive this select award. “Being recognized as a Distinguished California Partnership Academy is […]]]>

The California Department of Education gives an exclusive nod to local programming.

Monterey High School’s Sports Professions and Recreational Careers Academy has been named a 2022 California Partnership Academies Distinguished Academy. It is one of only three programs across the state to receive this select award.

“Being recognized as a Distinguished California Partnership Academy is an incredible achievement, and being named one of three statewide is significant and a testament to the commitment of the staff and the commitment of our students,” said Tom Newton, Principal of Monterey High. in a press release.

There are hundreds of schools across the state that subscribe to the California Partnership Academies model – essentially a three-year program structured like a school within a school. The academies incorporate integrated academic and professional technical training, business partnerships, mentoring and internships.

According to the California Department of Education, Distinguished Academies are those that “demonstrate exceptional fidelity to delivering high-quality educational programs that integrate core academics and professional technical training to benefit dozens of thousands of promising California high school students.

This type of work at Monterey High’s Sports Professions and Recreational Careers Academy dates back to 1999. Funded by a state grant, the program is designed for students wishing to pursue a career in sports, sports medicine or related fields. Hobbies. The academy’s mission is to provide students with a college-preparatory education, pushing them to fulfill the University of California/California State University admission requirements throughout their tenure in the program. About 120 Monterey High students attend the academy each year, at least 50% of whom are identified as at risk.

In addition to college qualifications, students are also required to complete a 60-hour internship in the health/recreation career fields in the profession that most interests them. In order to prepare students for their internship search, community professionals are asked to complete a mock interview process with each program participant. Additionally, students have the opportunity throughout the year to visit various college campuses and technical schools, as well as participate in hands-on activities at local vocational schools related to the healthcare industry.

“We are proud to support our students in their high school goals and future goals,” Monterey High vice-principal Chelsea Warner said in a press release.

More information about the Monterey High School Academy of Athletic and Recreational Careers can be found here.

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🌱 Proposed consolidation of public school buildings + voice actress https://fpru.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-proposed-consolidation-of-public-school-buildings-voice-actress/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 21:12:38 +0000 https://fpru.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-proposed-consolidation-of-public-school-buildings-voice-actress/ Hello again, Norfolk! Important update: All of you, as readers, have made the Norfolk Daily such a success that I am honored to announce the next phase of the newsletter. The fix is looking for a local writer and entrepreneur to lead the Norfolk Daily. While I enjoyed getting to know this community, we want […]]]>

Hello again, Norfolk! Important update: All of you, as readers, have made the Norfolk Daily such a success that I am honored to announce the next phase of the newsletter. The fix is looking for a local writer and entrepreneur to lead the Norfolk Daily. While I enjoyed getting to know this community, we want to pass the torch to someone truly local to write about Norfolk for the long term. So if you want to earn extra income while making this newsletter a more valuable resource for your neighbors, learn more and apply here.


First, today’s weather forecast:

Costs; a bit of rain in the morning. Top: 66 Bottom: 31.


Here are the top three stories from today in Norfolk:

  1. A Norfolk native has landed a big role in an upcoming DreamWorks animated series. Pavar Snipe currently lives in New York and has been tapped to voice new animated character Angela Baker in the new “Dragons: The Nine Realms” series. Snipe graduated from Granby High School and was on the Boodah Brother Morning Show on station 103 JAMZ in Norfolk. (wtkr.com)
  2. A proposed new settlement plan that would shore up aging school buildings has prompted some Norfolk citizens to seek comment on the proposal. The plan is to close Madison Alternative School and transfer students to Lindenwood Elementary, but was pushed back by the separation of students from Lindenwood, which could destroy the school’s culture. Proponents of the proposal say 49 of the schools in the district are over 50 years old and unsuitable for students, while many schools in the district are at 70% capacity. (WAVY.com)
  3. A local the judge has refused a competency test for former Norfolk Sheriff Bob McCabe, who was found guilty of public corruption over the summer. The former sheriff was found guilty of accepting bribes from prison vendors in exchange for favorable results related to contracts with the Norfolk prison. McCabe will be sentenced in May and will show no signs of incompetence. (WAVY.com)

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Today in Norfolk:

  • Anna At the Little Norfolk Theater (8:00 p.m.)

From my notebook:

  • The Norfolk Animal Shelter shares the adorable dog Morpheus who is looking for his forever home. Click to see if this dog with a Matrix-inspired name will keep you away from your computer in 2022. (Facebook)
  • The City of Norfolk announces that its popular Emerging Leaders program is returning this summer. Click to submit your application. (Twitter)
  • City of Norfolk offices will be closed on Monday, February 21 in recognition of George Washington’s birthday. Offices will resume normal business hours on February 22. (Facebook)

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Sean Peek

About me: Sean Peek is a writer and entrepreneur with a degree in English Literature from Weber State University. Over the years, he has worked as a writer, editor, SEO specialist and marketing manager for various digital media companies. He is currently co-owner and operator of content creation agency Lightning Media Partners.

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Bill Banning KY Transgender Women From Competing in Public Schools and University Women’s Sports Licensing Committee | In depth https://fpru.org/bill-banning-ky-transgender-women-from-competing-in-public-schools-and-university-womens-sports-licensing-committee-in-depth/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 15:06:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/bill-banning-ky-transgender-women-from-competing-in-public-schools-and-university-womens-sports-licensing-committee-in-depth/ FRANKFORT, Ky. (WDRB) — A bill banning transgender girls and women from competing on women’s teams at public middle and high schools and post-secondary institutions in Kentucky was approved by the House Education Committee on Tuesday. House Bill 23, sponsored by Representative Ryan Dotson, passed the panel by a vote of 13 to 6. A […]]]>

FRANKFORT, Ky. (WDRB) — A bill banning transgender girls and women from competing on women’s teams at public middle and high schools and post-secondary institutions in Kentucky was approved by the House Education Committee on Tuesday.

House Bill 23, sponsored by Representative Ryan Dotson, passed the panel by a vote of 13 to 6. A Republican joined the Democrats on the committee in opposition.

The legislation directs the Kentucky High School Athletic Association and public post-secondary institutions to adopt policies prohibiting participation in women’s sports by those born male at birth. The measure does not cover K-5 sports.

A similar measure that ordered KHSAA to pass regulations prohibiting people identified as male on their birth certificates from competing on women’s sports teams was approved by the Senate Education Committee on Thursday.

Dotson, R-Winchester, said KHSAA’s current policies on the participation of transgender female student-athletes in sports that match their gender identity, which require sex reassignment and post-pubertal hormone therapy, are insufficient to to create “a level playing field for our girls across the Commonwealth”. .”

“By the time of puberty, the physiological differences are already so prevalent and the physical advantages are already there,” he said. “…This law ensures that both sexes have the opportunity to participate in competitive sport.”

Recent laws prohibiting transgender women from participating in women’s sports face legal challenges, and Jackie McGranahan with the ACLU of Kentucky said the state could join others in court if HB 23 becomes law.

“When a state enacts unconstitutional laws and loses in court, taxpayers foot the bill,” said McGranahan, political strategist for the ACLU of Kentucky. “Ultimately, this bill violates Title IX, puts Kentucky at risk of losing money, harms transgender youth to address a problem that clearly doesn’t exist.”

Dotson said there are transgender girls taking “spots” on school sports teams, leading to some cisgender girls being excluded from participation.

“Part of our role as a legislature is to walk the waters and see what’s going on and try to get ahead of some of these issues,” said Rep. Shane Baker, R-Somerset. “Sometimes you need to be preventative to make sure you avoid problems before they happen or get worse.”

Some representatives were also concerned that exceeding HB 23 would jeopardize NCAA eligibility for public post-secondary institutions in Kentucky.

Rep. Killian Timoney, a Republican from Lexington who voted against HB 23, said the fact that about half of all transgender youth have considered suicide in the past two years should be “a dire red flag” for the legislators.

“Right now we’re looking at 50 trans athletes out of 200,000 NCAA athletes, so for non-maths in the house it’s 0.00025%,” Timoney said. “We have time to do it right.”

HB 23 moves to the Chamber floor for further examination.

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