School university – FPRU http://fpru.org/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 19:07:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fpru.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon-1-150x150.png School university – FPRU http://fpru.org/ 32 32 FAU announces plans for dental school – UNIVERSITY PRESS https://fpru.org/fau-announces-plans-for-dental-school-university-press/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 19:07:57 +0000 https://fpru.org/fau-announces-plans-for-dental-school-university-press/ With a looming dental shortage in Florida, the FAU announced plans for a dental school. If plans go ahead, it will be Florida’s second public dental school. The FAU recently revealed its intention to alleviate the dental shortage by building a dental school. There is only one public dental school in the state, which is […]]]>

With a looming dental shortage in Florida, the FAU announced plans for a dental school. If plans go ahead, it will be Florida’s second public dental school.

The FAU recently revealed its intention to alleviate the dental shortage by building a dental school. There is only one public dental school in the state, which is the University of Florida (UF). There are two private dental schools in Florida, including Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM) and Nova Southeastern University (NSU).

Currently, 63 of Florida’s 67 counties face dental shortages, with about a quarter of the state’s population struggling with a lack of dental care. With Florida’s population rapidly increasing by the day, the FAU College of Medicine believes this problem will worsen over the next decade.

With insufficient dental care, many have turned to emergency rooms to treat serious dental problems. This is becoming a costly problem for Floridians.

“It creates a bottleneck in the system, it creates suboptimal care, especially if nobody knows anything about your teeth and your dentistry,” said Julie Pilitis, dean of Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine.

According to Pilitis, Florida alone billed about $620 million in 2021 in medical bills for dental-related ER and hospital visits. She also estimated that dental school could save South Floridians $300 million.

If dental school plans go ahead, FAU dental school will be the second public dental school to be established in Florida and the fourth after UF, NSU, and LECOM. It would be the first public dental school in over 50 years since UF Dental School opened in 1972.

Compared to other highly populated states, California has three public dental schools, Texas has four, and New York has two. As a result, 58% of dental students in Florida will attend out-of-state dental school, according to a investigation the American Dental Association conducted in 2020-2021.

“We need more options for people to train here. Why do we need this and why do we care? Once we let someone go, they might not come back,” Pilitis said of the importance of students agreeing to go to school in the state.

The university announced the plans for the dental school at the FAU Faculty Senate meeting on September 12 and the Board of Trustees meeting on September 16.

According to the Board of Directors, FAU has 50 community partners supporting the expansion of FAU Health, including major partners such as Broward Health, Tenet Health, Cleveland Clinic Florida and Memorial Healthcare System.

The school will be named after dentist, philanthropist and former board member Dr. Jeffery Feingold. Feingold served on the board from 2010 to 2021 and was the late husband of current BOT member Barbara Feingold. His wife succeeded him as a member of the BOT shortly before his death that year.

“It’s always been her dream to see a dental school here,” Feingold said of her late husband’s legacy at the September 16 board meeting.

The total cost of the building is estimated at $64.25 million. The university already has a committed philanthropic pledge of $30 million and has a legislative budget request of $34.2 million. For the operation of the dental school, the non-recurring budget is requested at $85.5 million and $37.9 million for recurring costs, bringing the initial operating budget to $124 million.

The university’s plans for the dental school are currently not finalized and will be proposed to the state legislature in November.

Melanie Gomez is a staff writer for University Press. For more information regarding this story or other stories, email him at [email protected]

]]>
SAU Students Join Prestigious Stanford d.school University Innovation Fellowship Program https://fpru.org/sau-students-join-prestigious-stanford-d-school-university-innovation-fellowship-program/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 14:05:48 +0000 https://fpru.org/sau-students-join-prestigious-stanford-d-school-university-innovation-fellowship-program/ Saint Augustine University (SAU) students Kevin Collins, Marcus Davis and Peter Musenge were among 242 students from 63 higher education institutions in 16 countries named University Innovation Fellows. “New Fellows design experiences that help all students develop the skills and mindsets needed to navigate these uncertain times and shape the future they want to see,” […]]]>

Saint Augustine University (SAU) students Kevin Collins, Marcus Davis and Peter Musenge were among 242 students from 63 higher education institutions in 16 countries named University Innovation Fellows.

“New Fellows design experiences that help all students develop the skills and mindsets needed to navigate these uncertain times and shape the future they want to see,” said Leticia Britos Cavagnaro, co-director of the University Innovation Fellows program. . “They give back to their school communities, along with learning strategies that will help them become career leaders after graduation.”

Collins and Davis are enrolled in the SAU Masters of Public Administration program. Musenge holds a double major in biology and engineering mathematics. They are the first of the institution University Innovation Fellows (UIF) cohorts, sponsored by the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school) at Stanford University and Google.

“Part of our challenge as university innovation fellows is to look at the needs of our campus and figure out where we can bring innovation,” Collins said.

The UIF program teaches students about design-centered thinking while enabling them to become agents of change for their respective universities. Design thinking is a way to define and solve difficult challenges.

“Reinventing SAU involves empowering our student leaders to serve as co-creators of current and future student experiences,” said President Dr. Christine Johnson McPhail. “The inclusion of our students in the University Innovation Fellows program aligns with our institution’s mission, vision and strategic initiatives to bring diversity into innovation and entrepreneurship.”

The students are planning an ambitious innovation project this fall called Falcon Fl1ght LAB. The Falcon Fl1ght LAB is a Collaboratorium and MakerSpace designed for students to engage in a facilitated environment that fosters creative problem solving and solution design. This design of space will include divergent and convergent technology-enhanced spaces for ideation and collaboration. Based on design thinking, SAU students can collaborate and conceptualize solutions to solve current university and city dilemmas from a creative perspective.

“We noticed that there was no space on campus for problem solving, idea generation/collaboration, or product prototyping using technology,” Musenge said. “We believe the creation of the Falcon Fl1ght LAB merges all three areas into a single space that inspires students to solve our most pressing challenges in the community and the university.”

“It’s about being a change agent with the skills to make things happen,” Davis said.

Terry T. Kidd, Ph.D., vice president of strategic planning, research, technology and innovation, and Veronica Creech, vice president of economic development and external engagement, lead the Falcon Fl1ght LAB, the revolutionary student-led idea that is part of the Innovation Portfolio.

“SAU applied for the UIF program in the spring of 2021,” Dr. Kidd said. “Kevin, Peter and Marcus have been heavily engaged in training, webinars and coaching sessions designed to teach and develop their design thinking skills. Additionally, they have worked with Stanford University over the weekend and did their SAU homework.

The UIF program is an example of how SAU fulfills its mission. This mission ensures that students at the university will have meaningful opportunities to practice leadership and become agents of change. Collins, Davis and Musenge will attend an in-person conference for the University Innovation Fellows program at Stanford University in March. Fellows from across the country will come together to discuss their projects and network. Faculty Champions will also be on hand to support their students and strategize on how to better support them.

“As a faculty champion, I have seen firsthand their abilities to showcase their innovation and entrepreneurial skills,” Dr. Kidd said. “The Falcon Fl1ght LAB proposed by the SAU is a brilliant idea since all the ideas are developed and led by the students. They are the brainchild and genius behind this project.

This Makerspace receives contributions from multiple sectors to enable a new level of engagement to develop, prototype, and test real-world solutions that emerge from the Collaboratorium.

“The Falcon Fl1ght LAB will help create a space that offers solutions to improve the campus and the surrounding community,” Creech said. “The Falcon Fl1ght LAB will expose students to various design thinking principles, technologies, community members and investors. Additionally, other entrepreneurs will enrich the academic experience that prepares students for today’s global society.

Click on here to learn more about the Falcon Fl1ght LAB.

About Saint Augustine University

Founded in 1867 by the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina, Saint Augustine University’s mission is to support a learning community in which students can prepare themselves academically, socially, and spiritually for leadership in a complex, diverse, and changing world. rapid evolution.

About the University Innovation Fellows Program

The University Innovation Fellows program empowers students to become agents of change in their schools. Scholars are a global community of students leading a movement to ensure that all students acquire the attitudes, skills and knowledge needed to compete in the economy of the future. These student leaders from schools across the country create new opportunities that help their peers develop an entrepreneurial spirit, build creative confidence, seize opportunities, define problems, and tackle global challenges. Fellows create spaces for innovation for students, found entrepreneurship organizations, host experiential events, and work with faculty and administrators to develop courses. They serve as advocates for lasting institutional change to university leaders and represent their schools at national events. The University Innovation Fellows are a program of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school) at Stanford University. Learn more about collegeinnovationfellows.org.

]]>
Did Brett Favre’s charity funnel funds to his old school, the University of Southern Mississippi? https://fpru.org/did-brett-favres-charity-funnel-funds-to-his-old-school-the-university-of-southern-mississippi/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 17:15:36 +0000 https://fpru.org/did-brett-favres-charity-funnel-funds-to-his-old-school-the-university-of-southern-mississippi/ With this most recent update, it looks like the walls are closing in on the former NFL icon, but honestly, the scrutiny and possible punishment might well be deserved. Did Brett Favre’s NGO secretly donate money to the USM Athletic Foundation? According to reports, it appears the former Green Bay Packers QB and NFL great […]]]>

With this most recent update, it looks like the walls are closing in on the former NFL icon, but honestly, the scrutiny and possible punishment might well be deserved.

Did Brett Favre’s NGO secretly donate money to the USM Athletic Foundation?

According to reports, it appears the former Green Bay Packers QB and NFL great Brett Favre may be embroiled in a less-than-legal scenario in which his charity seems to have funneled money at the University of Southern Mississippi Athletic Foundation during the period of 2018-2020. In effect, tax records seem to show that Favre also attempted to raise funds for a new volleyball center at the institution he previously attended, and where his daughter also studied and was a member of the volleyball team at the time.

Favre’s charity, “Favre 4 Hope”, was established to support charities that provide support to underserved and disabled children in addition to breast cancer patients, according to its mission statement. Lately, concerns have been raised when tax records appeared to show the charity made large donations to the USM Athletic Foundation that exceeded $130,000. It is understood that the amount in question was significantly higher than payments made to other organisations.

The Breakdown: A look at “Favre 4 Hope” and its gifts

As far as we know, “Favre 4 Hope” donated $60,000 to USM in 2018, $46,817 in 2019, and $26,175 in 2020. Compared to the largest donation made to any other organization over the same period, $11,000 at the Special Olympics held in Mississippi in 2019, there is an obvious size difference. To be specific, the largest donations made in 2018 and 2020 were payments of $10,000 made to various organizations. According to records, additional payments were also made to Favre’s daughter’s high school before she enrolled at USM. Not a good look to say the least.

In case you missed it, the ‘Favre 4 Hope’ charity is at the heart of a much larger scandal involving the embezzlement of around $77 million, making it the world’s biggest public corruption case. of Mississippi history. As it stands, it is claimed that Favre texted to the director of a non-profit organization expressing concern that his name might be made public, according to reports.

‘Favre 4 Hope’ has failed in its obligation

There you have it, besides the obvious illegality of Favre’s actions and his charity, there is also the ethical obligation they failed to meet. That is to say, the money the former Packers star and his NGO received came with a mandate as to how it was supposed to be spent as far as the donors themselves were concerned. By now, we’ve seen former Mississippi Department of Human Services Executive Director John Davis plead guilty earlier this month to a count of conspiracy and a count of theft regarding programs receiving federal funds. Davis is understood to have cooperated with four unnamed co-conspirators, two of whom are executive directors of organizations.

“MDHS provided federal funds to two nonprofits and then ordered the two nonprofits to fraudulently award contracts to various entities and individuals for social services that were never provided,” the United States Department of Justice said in a statement Sept. 22.

From Hall of Fame to Shame: Brett Favre’s record is tarnished

It’s hard to imagine that the same QB who endeared himself to us so long ago is now the central figure in what appears to be a case of massive fraud. Fans will remember that Favre played quarterback at Southern Miss from 1987 to 1990, before being selected as the 33rd overall pick by the Atlanta Falcons in the 1991 NFL Draft. Traded to the Packers from Green Bay the following offseason, Favre would become a household name between 1992 and 2007, as he won three consecutive MVP awards – 1995-97 – and Super Bowl XXXI. After his time in Green Bay, he joined the Jets in 2008 before moving to the Vikings for a two-season stay (2009 and 2010) before ending his illustrious career. The legendary signal caller was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016 and until now was widely considered a darling of the sport. How times change.

]]>
School College Closures and Cancellations in the Tampa Bay Area Tropical Storm Hurricane Ian https://fpru.org/school-college-closures-and-cancellations-in-the-tampa-bay-area-tropical-storm-hurricane-ian/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 02:42:18 +0000 https://fpru.org/school-college-closures-and-cancellations-in-the-tampa-bay-area-tropical-storm-hurricane-ian/ TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) – Several school districts and universities in the Tampa Bay area have announced closures related to Hurricane Ian. This list will be updated as more locations announce closures as the Florida storm approaches. How to find your bug out zone In the general Tampa Bay area, all Catholic schools and early learning […]]]>

TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) – Several school districts and universities in the Tampa Bay area have announced closures related to Hurricane Ian. This list will be updated as more locations announce closures as the Florida storm approaches.

In the general Tampa Bay area, all Catholic schools and early learning centers in the Diocese of St. Petersburg will be closed starting September 27, including Hillsborough, Pinellas, Pasco, Hernando and Citrus counties.

Hernando County

All schools and district offices in Hernando will be closed Tuesday through Friday while officials prepare some school buildings as shelters. You can read more about these shelters here.

Hillsborough County

Schools in Hillsborough County will close on Monday so the county can prepare to use the buildings as shelters ahead of Tropical Storm Ian. All schools will close from Monday September 26 to Thursday September 29.

The City of Tampa is opening 16 “out-of-school camps” sites Monday and Tuesday to help families impacted by school closings. You can find a full list of these sites here.

Berkeley Prep School will also be closed through Sept. 30 following Hillsborough County’s Area A evacuation order. The school will notify parents, students and staff later if they will be open on Friday.

Tampa Holy Names Academy will be closed Sept. 27-30, including classes, after-school programs, and events.

The Gulfport and Tampa campuses of the Stetson University College of Law will also be closed until Thursday, September 29 due to anticipated impacts from Hurricane Ian.

St. Mary’s Episcopal School will be closed until September 29.

Hardee County

Schools will be closed Tuesday and Thursday.

manatee county

Manatee County schools are open as usual on Monday, September 26.

Pasco County

Schools in Pasco County will close Tuesday, September 27 through Friday, September 30.

Pinellas County

Some schools in Pinellas County will have early layoffs Monday so the county can prepare to open them to the public as special needs shelters before Ian.

The following schools in Pinellas County will release students at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, September 26:

  • Palm Harbor University High School
  • Dunedin Highland Secondary School
  • Johns Hopkins College

All schools in Pinellas County will close Tuesday, September 27 and are expected to remain closed through September 30. Extracurricular activities are also cancelled.

Additionally, the Canterbury School of Florida will be closed from Tuesday, September 27 through Thursday, September 29.

Shorecrest Preparatory School in St. Petersburg announced it will close Sept. 27-29 as Hurricane Ian continues toward Tampa Bay.

Polk County

Polk County schools are open as usual on Monday, September 26 and Tuesday, September 27. On Sunday, the school district said after-school activities could be canceled on Tuesday and schools would likely be closed Wednesday and Thursday.

Sarasota County

Sarasota County schools will be closed starting Tuesday out of caution for Hurricane Ian. It will also give them time to prepare facilities as emergency evacuation centers.

“As we continue to monitor the path of Hurricane Ian and its potential impacts, residents are encouraged to review their emergency plans and prepare their go-kits,” said Sarasota County Administrator Jonathan Lewis.

University of South Florida

Classes at the University of South Florida are canceled for most of this week. The university has announced that classes will be canceled from September 26 to October 3.

University of Tampa

The University of Tampa will be closed starting Monday, September 26. The university plans to resume all campus operations by Monday, October 3. The campus, including the residence halls, could begin to be evacuated as early as Monday.

Saint Leo University

Saint Leo University offers online courses for all Florida locations before the storm. According to a statement from the university, “In addition to the residential campus in Pasco County, Florida, this includes Florida locations in Tampa, MacDill Air Force Base, the Spring Hill, Brooksville and New Port Richey campuses of Pasco-Hernando. State University”.

Pasco-Hernando State College

The college begins its operational closures from Tuesday to Friday.

Nova Southeastern University

NSU’s Tampa Bay/Clearwater campus will close Sept. 27-October 2, school officials say. Classes and activities are expected to resume on October 3. The Fort Myers campus will also close.

South Florida College

Florida Southern College canceled all classes Sept. 26-30. Students living on campus may be required to relocate to an on-campus shelter. Food will be provided, but the college says options may be limited. For students living in college-owned homes, FSC is asking them to move to Branscomb Auditorium at 5 p.m. September 27 and stay until the hurricane has passed.

St. Petersburg College

Saint Petersburg College will be closed from September 27 to 30. All classes will be canceled and all areas of campus closed due to potential impacts from Hurricane Ian.

University of the South – Tampa Campus

The South University campus in Tampa will close beginning at 5 p.m. on September 26. University officials said the school will remain closed until September 29.

Keizer University

The Sarasota, Tampa, Clearwater, New Port Richey and Lakeland campuses of Keiser University will be closed September 27-29.

]]>
Cal State LA Students Navigate Night School – University Times https://fpru.org/cal-state-la-students-navigate-night-school-university-times/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 03:40:28 +0000 https://fpru.org/cal-state-la-students-navigate-night-school-university-times/ In the evening, Cal State LA students can take classes on campus. The length of each type may vary depending on the subject itself. An archeology seminar, for example, takes place from 6:00 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. Classes based on activities like two-dimensional animation last six hours until 7:20 p.m. Freshman Emily Medina is currently […]]]>

In the evening, Cal State LA students can take classes on campus. The length of each type may vary depending on the subject itself. An archeology seminar, for example, takes place from 6:00 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. Classes based on activities like two-dimensional animation last six hours until 7:20 p.m.

Freshman Emily Medina is currently taking Film Philosophy from 6-7:15 p.m.

Although the time slot was not her first choice, Medina explained how the evening class managed to fit into her schedule.

“I signed up for my classes late,” Medina said. “I have a job, but I come to school on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and the days off are for work. I feel like it’s a good balance between the two. »

As far as transportation consideration goes, Medina isn’t looking to take any classes from a similar period in the future.

“I wouldn’t mind a Zoom course; I would just try to avoid taking night classes in the future because I don’t live close enough,” Medina said.

Luz Ramirez, a senior on an Integrative Field Internship, a hands-on course for social work majors, expressed discomfort using public transportation at night.

“I had no choice,” Ramirez said. “With the internship in the field, you are assigned to it. Since it’s so late, I really think they should consider transportation times. It’s also getting darker earlier now, so taking the bus seems a bit dangerous.

Ramirez also mentioned how a Zoom option for the class would better suit his schedule.

“Last semester Zoom made everything more convenient for me,” Ramirez said. “I felt like I could focus on the material better in my own house. Now I have to worry about getting to class on time.

In a previous postUT has covered the issue of in-person versus online instruction at Cal State LA for this fall semester.

The dimly lit lights and nearly empty campus contribute to the general feeling of distrust among students when in school after dark. The University Times has already covered this topic in a article published last semester.

Sophomore Melina Vargas has expressed concern about the lack of safety she feels while waiting for her class to start.

“It’s very creepy. I’ve had times when I was walking at night, and a guy comes up to me and says an inappropriate thing,” sophomore Melina Vargas said. “They should have someone to keep an eye out, especially around the Beaux-Arts buildings and the King Hall, because it’s really dark.”

Similar questionable activity is not a new phenomenon, according to Vargas.

“That’s the main problem; there’s been a lot of creeps lately,” Vargas said. “Last semester there was a guy [allegedly] take pictures of girls’ feet in the library. There should be more security available. Even though it’s just a guard that circles around this building, keeping an eye on things.

Melina explained that evening classes were the only options available that would fit into her schedule.

“I tried to take classes during the day to fit the rest of my schedule, but the only options were either between classes or right after. I would only have a minute to run from Salazar Hall to Beaux-Arts building. Especially with the recent heat, I don’t run that distance with a nine-pound computer in my bag.

Cal State LA currently has public security escort services in place, available 24/7 to anyone on campus. Students, faculty, staff and visitors are encouraged to call (323) 343-3700 with any security concerns.

The university could not be reached for comment, despite an email and a call.

]]>
First Lady Jill Biden visits Knoxville School, University of Tennessee https://fpru.org/first-lady-jill-biden-visits-knoxville-school-university-of-tennessee/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 15:43:01 +0000 https://fpru.org/first-lady-jill-biden-visits-knoxville-school-university-of-tennessee/ Monday morning at Sarah Moore Greene Magnet Academy started out like any other day at East Knoxville Elementary School. Morning announcements crackled over the intercom, as students heard about lunch options and birthdays. But then Principal Robin Curry took the mic. “We have a very special guest with us today,” Curry said. “The President’s Wife, […]]]>

Monday morning at Sarah Moore Greene Magnet Academy started out like any other day at East Knoxville Elementary School. Morning announcements crackled over the intercom, as students heard about lunch options and birthdays.

But then Principal Robin Curry took the mic.

“We have a very special guest with us today,” Curry said.

“The President’s Wife, Dr. Jill Biden!”

Biden greeted Curry outside of school before visiting Kaitlyn Baker’s third-grade class.

It was difficult for students to pay attention after Biden, US Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona and reporters with cameras entered the roombut after a quick introduction, the students went back to working on their basic phonics skills.

On Monday, First Lady Jill Biden and Principal Robin Curry welcome third-grade students to the Sarah Moore Greene Magnet Academy in Knoxville.  Education Secretary Miguel Cardona and the First Lady are on a national education tour.

“They’ve never been so quiet before,” Baker joked.

The classroom was the first stop on a tour across the eastern United States organized by Cardona, highlighting how schools are supporting teachers and students after the coronavirus pandemic.

Biden’s trip focused on small moments, like helping third-grade students with their work, and big ones, like touting a national message like respect for teachers, which was the culmination of the rally. University of Tennessee that looked like a campaign stop but was really a bipartisan show of support for teachers.

]]>
Emily Grubert – Keough School https://fpru.org/emily-grubert-keough-school/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 01:54:34 +0000 https://fpru.org/emily-grubert-keough-school/ Skill Macro-energy systems; socio-environmental assessment; multi-criteria decision support At Keough School Emily Grubert is an associate professor of sustainable energy policy at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. Biography Emily Grubert is a civil engineer and environmental sociologist who researches how we can make better decisions about large infrastructure […]]]>

Skill

Macro-energy systems; socio-environmental assessment; multi-criteria decision support

At Keough School

Emily Grubert is an associate professor of sustainable energy policy at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame.

Biography

Emily Grubert is a civil engineer and environmental sociologist who researches how we can make better decisions about large infrastructure systems, especially when it comes to the justice-focused decarbonization of America’s energy system. Specifically, she investigates the life-cycle socio-environmental impacts associated with future policies and infrastructure and how community and societal priorities can be better integrated into multi-criteria policies and project decisions. Its main methods include scenario analysis, life cycle assessment, survey and interview research, and text mining.

Prior to joining Notre Dame Faculty, Grubert was assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and, as a courtesy, public policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology (2019-2022) and deputy assistant secretary for carbon management at the U.S. Department of Health. ‘energy. (2021-2022). She holds a doctorate in environment and resources from Stanford.

]]>
Gwendolyn Purifoye – Keough School https://fpru.org/gwendolyn-purifoye-keough-school/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 01:29:20 +0000 https://fpru.org/gwendolyn-purifoye-keough-school/ Skill Race, place and the built environment; urban sociology; ethnographic methods, visual sociology. At Keough School Gwendolyn Purifoye is Assistant Professor of Racial Justice and Conflict Transformation at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. She is one of the key faculty members at Keough School’s Kroc Institute for International […]]]>

Skill

Race, place and the built environment; urban sociology; ethnographic methods, visual sociology.

At Keough School

Gwendolyn Purifoye is Assistant Professor of Racial Justice and Conflict Transformation at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. She is one of the key faculty members at Keough School’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and Keough School faculty member Klau Institute for Civil and Human Rights.

Course

Research and publications

Purifoye’s research focuses on investigations of how material infrastructure, transportation systems, and spatiality shape the experiences of racially and class marginalized individuals and communities. As an urban ethnographer, Purifoye has spent several years conducting extensive fieldwork in Chicago, Washington, DC, and Newark, where she examines the lived experiences of black and brown people in public places and neighborhoods. In the fall of 2022, she was awarded a visiting professorship at Brown University’s Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America to study how black people are experiencing the current redevelopment boom in Newark after enduring decades of widespread systemic racism and disinvestment.

Purifoye’s first book, Race in Motion: Public Transport and Restricted Mobile Spaces (under contract to NYU Press) uses ethnographic and archival data to examine how public transportation is used to support persistent inequalities and inequities that are racial, spatial, material, social, and embodied. This book presents research that shows that although some may think that public transport exemplifies racial progress in the United States – after all, black people no longer have to sit in the back of the bus – public transport continues to be a distinct and unequal experience.

Recent work

In the media

Biography

Before coming to Notre Dame, Purifoye was an associate professor at North Park University. She received her doctorate in sociology from Loyola University in Chicago. In addition to her academic research, Purifoye works directly with community organizations and regional planning agencies, including the Metropolitan Planning Council and the Regional Transportation Authority. She is currently a member of the advisory board of the City of Chicago’s United Nations Safe Cities Project, where she contributes her expertise as a member of the Gender-Based Violence Research Advisory Group.

]]>
Colin Barr – Keough School https://fpru.org/colin-barr-keough-school/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 14:21:19 +0000 https://fpru.org/colin-barr-keough-school/ Skill modern Ireland; Catholicism; British political history; migration history At Keough School Colin Barr is Professor of Modern Irish History at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. He is director of the Clingen Family Center for the Study of Modern Ireland, who is housed at Keough School Keough-Naughton Institute […]]]>

Skill

modern Ireland; Catholicism; British political history; migration history

At Keough School

Colin Barr is Professor of Modern Irish History at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. He is director of the Clingen Family Center for the Study of Modern Ireland, who is housed at Keough School Keough-Naughton Institute of Irish Studies.

Course

  • The Making of Modern Ireland (undergraduate course in Irish studies)
  • The Northern Ireland Troubles (undergraduate course in Irish Studies)
  • The Troubles of Ireland: Politics, Violence and History (academic seminar)

Biography

Colin Barr was born in Canada and raised in the United States. He holds a BA from Stonehill College and a PhD from Cambridge University, and has held academic appointments in Ireland, the United States and the United Kingdom. Barr has been a visiting scholar at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge and the University of Newcastle, Australia. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Research and publications

Barr’s work seeks to place the history of the island of Ireland and its people in the widest possible context, including that of the United Kingdom, the European continent, the Roman Catholic Church and the global Irish diaspora. He is the author or editor of several books, including The Irish Empire: The Roman Catholic Church in the English-Speaking World, 1829-1914 (Cambridge University Press, 2020), The European Culture Wars in Ireland: The Callan Schools Affair, 1868-1881 (University College Dublin Press, 2010), Paul Cullen, John Henry Newman and the Catholic University of Ireland, 1845-65 (University of Notre Dame Press, 2003), Nation/Nazione: Irish Nationalism and the Italian Risorgimento (co-edited with Michele Finelli and Anne O’Connor; University College Dublin Press, 2014), and Religion and Greater Ireland: Christianity and Irish Global Networks, 1750-1950 (co-edited with Hilary M. Carey; McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015).

Barr’s next book, The Irish Pope: Paul Cullen, 1803-1878, will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2023. Future projects include ‘O’Connell’s Heirs’, a study of Irish Catholic democracy; and “Imperial Women: Nuns and the Making of Greater Ireland,” a world history of Irish nuns.

]]>
Santosh Kumar – Keough School https://fpru.org/santosh-kumar-keough-school/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 14:19:38 +0000 https://fpru.org/santosh-kumar-keough-school/ Skill Development Economics; global health economy; economics of early childhood development; human capital, India At Keough School Santosh Kumar is an associate professor of development economics and global health at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. It is also affiliated with Notre Dame’s Eck Institute for Global Health. Course […]]]>

Skill

Development Economics; global health economy; economics of early childhood development; human capital, India

At Keough School

Santosh Kumar is an associate professor of development economics and global health at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. It is also affiliated with Notre Dame’s Eck Institute for Global Health.

Course

Research and publications

Santosh Kumar is an applied microeconomist whose research focuses on global health economics and economic development in low- and middle-income countries. Her research examines the causal association between child and maternal health, human capital and poverty.

Kumar is currently working on research projects related to the effects of prenatal conditions on birth outcomes and human capital accumulation; the effects of birth endowment, postnatal investments and micronutrient deficiencies on human capital, and the effects of access to physical infrastructure (roads, electricity, sanitation) and microfinance on human well-being. Kumar’s work uses experimental and quasi-experimental research methods and has extensive experience in survey data collection in India, Bhutan and Albania. His research has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals.

Recent work

Biography

Kumar earned a BA (Honours) in Economics from the University of Delhi, a Masters in Economics from the Delhi School of Economics and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Houston. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies at Harvard’s TH Chan School of Public Health and he also worked at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle. Before coming to Notre Dame, Kumar was an associate professor of economics at Sam Houston State University in Texas.

Professional roles/positions

  • Research Fellow, Institute for Labor Studies, Germany
  • Academic Writer, PLOS ONE
  • Academic Writer, PLOS Global Public Health
  • Assistant Editor, Oxford Open Economy
]]>