School institution – FPRU http://fpru.org/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 19:37:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fpru.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon-1-150x150.png School institution – FPRU http://fpru.org/ 32 32 Vim, vigor, vibrancy in Laguna Beach’s favorite 104-year-old arts institution https://fpru.org/vim-vigor-vibrancy-in-laguna-beachs-favorite-104-year-old-arts-institution/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 19:37:22 +0000 https://fpru.org/vim-vigor-vibrancy-in-laguna-beachs-favorite-104-year-old-arts-institution/ Laguna Art Museum Executive Director Julie Perlin Lee with John Sonsini’s oil painting, ‘Francisco & Raul’. Photo by Barbara McMurray By Barbara McMurray, Special for The Independent The Laguna Art Museum welcomed Julie Perlin Lee as Executive Director in May 2021. Fifteen months later, she has proven to be an energetic seeker of collaborations with […]]]>
Laguna Art Museum Executive Director Julie Perlin Lee with John Sonsini’s oil painting, ‘Francisco & Raul’. Photo by Barbara McMurray

By Barbara McMurray, Special for The Independent

The Laguna Art Museum welcomed Julie Perlin Lee as Executive Director in May 2021. Fifteen months later, she has proven to be an energetic seeker of collaborations with numerous institutions in the region, including the Boys & Girls Club of Central Orange Coast, Laguna Beach Pride 365, Laguna Beach Unified School District, Laguna Plein Air Painters Association, Laguna Beach Parents Club, Laguna Beach Live!, Laguna Beach Cultural Arts Center, Coast Film Festival and many more.

Creating living connections with all facets of the community is essential for the 104-year-old museum, said the Orange County native. With her husband David, an artist and teacher, their two children and the family cat, Brian, she returned to the continent in 2021 after five years in Avalon. There she served as executive director of the Catalina Island Museum. Before that, she spent eight years at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana.

The residents of Laguna Beach impressed Perlin Lee with their passion for maintaining their community’s reputation as an art colony with outstanding natural beauty.

She admits the pandemic has been tough on the museum and it has been difficult to bring visitors back to its galleries. She happily reports that LAM is once again welcoming schools for tours and artistic creations and returning to classrooms for arts education at both Laguna Elementary Schools. Volunteer guides gave 248 tours, connecting visitors to 14 exhibits and the public installation by artist Laguna Gerard Stripling.

“We are in a period of growth,” said Perlin Lee. “And our donor base is growing with us. We are energized by the fact that last year 28% of donations came from new donors.

She hopes to interest donors of all financial abilities, from those who want to help provide a student with supplies to complete an art course to donors who can fund one of LAM’s three teaching artists. Increasing the museum’s endowment continues to be a priority to secure its future as a permanent haven for art and creativity. She credits “an enthusiastic, forward-looking board of directors that helps me build a new group of philanthropic supporters.”

She and the board have meticulously reported on LAM’s financial and operational activities, earning her a Platinum Seal of Transparency award from Candid, an organization that tracks philanthropic funding.

The LAM, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2018, has scheduled exhibitions until 2025 focusing on works of art from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day. They will be a mix of exemplary artists from the modern (Jay DeFeo), contemporary (Shepard Fairey) and early California (Joseph Kleitsch) art periods.

“We really enjoy working with artists of today to interpret works from the past,” said Perlin Lee. “A recent successful example of this occurred when John Sonsini, considered one of America’s most important portrait painters, eloquently offered his perspective on our current exhibition of the once overlooked artist Francis De Erdely.”

LAM is also committed to recognizing Laguna Beach artists like William Mortenson, who had his photography school in town.

“We will share the exciting exhibits in development that will bring recognition to our community and to the museum,” said Perlin Lee.

The 10th LAM Art & Nature Festival in November will feature artist Rebeca Méndez, whose immersive 360-degree film titled The Sea Around Us will be exhibited in LAM’s largest gallery. It will be a breathtaking journey across the sea, from life on the surface to the seabed of the Catalina Channel. There, scientists are scrambling to understand the impact of thousands of barrels of DDT – a highly toxic pesticide banned in 1972 – dumped directly into the ocean from huge tanker barges decades ago.

Renowned oceanographer Sylvia Earle will deliver a keynote address. Artist Kelly Berg will draw museum visitors outside with Pyramidions, a series of alluring pyramids placed on and around Heisler Beach and Park for visitors to experience and explore. Each pyramidion will showcase Laguna’s unique geology. The works of the festival will be an interactive call to cherish and protect our natural environment.

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Student certificates are individually owned; no institution can keep it: HC https://fpru.org/student-certificates-are-individually-owned-no-institution-can-keep-it-hc/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 21:33:25 +0000 https://fpru.org/student-certificates-are-individually-owned-no-institution-can-keep-it-hc/ In a landmark judgment, the High Court of Punjab and Haryana ruled that a student’s certificates are his or her individual property and no other institution/individual can keep them without legal permission. “Whether, something is owed by a student or a student is required to do something legally stipulated, in the event of refusal, recourse […]]]>

In a landmark judgment, the High Court of Punjab and Haryana ruled that a student’s certificates are his or her individual property and no other institution/individual can keep them without legal permission.

“Whether, something is owed by a student or a student is required to do something legally stipulated, in the event of refusal, recourse may be had to the means provided by law to ensure compliance. Adopting the method of retaining original certificates/documents is unfair to say the least,” High Court Seat Sudhir Mittal observed.

The court was hearing a May 2022 plea from Monika, who had approached the high court against Pt BD Sharma University of Health Sciences, Rohtak.

She was admitted to the bachelor’s degree in dental sciences and she filed 52,090 with its original certificates. However, she did not register for the course and demanded a refund of the amount deposited and the return of her certificates. The request was not accepted by the institute.

She passed the National Eligibility Test for undergraduate medical courses in 2020 and after counseling was granted a place in February 2022 in the BDS course. The initial filing and original certificates were filed by her on February 7, 2022. However, she wrote a letter on March 14, 2022, requesting the cancellation of admission. In May, she represented the university for the return of filed charges and original documents. But the university disagreed. Following this, she went to the high court arguing that the documents are her property and cannot be kept by the university.

In the high court, the university had argued that the last date for council was April 28, 2022, and it was admitted as it was declared the winner in the first round. The university had referred to the Government of Haryana procedure for admission to MBBS/BDS courses that each student must execute a deposit of 10 lakh backed by two sureties that he/she would not leave the course halfway. In case the student leaves the course halfway, an amount of 10 lakh would be salvageable, the university had argued, adding that the Indian Government’s Directorate General of Health Sciences in February 2022 advised colleges not to accept offline resignation applications as such vacancies do not cannot be included in other counseling cycles. The petitioner did not apply online and therefore her application had no right to be granted, it was stated. “Original certificates cannot be returned unless and until the deposit is paid because the petitioner left the course halfway,” the university had said.

The tribunal observed that no admission requirement was brought to the notice of the tribunal authorizing the university to keep the original documents as security for the payment of the sums allegedly due. “…Thus, retaining the original documents as security is not durable in law,” the bench said, adding that the last date for consultation was April 28 and that it had hinted at the surrender of the headquarters on March 14.

“Therefore, it is doubtful whether the petitioner can be said to have left the course halfway,” the bench said, further observing that a student’s certificates are his or her individual property and that no other institution/nobody can keep them without legally. authority. The court has now ordered that his original certificates be returned within 10 days.


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‘An anchor institution’: Residents of Emerson, Nebraska buy groceries back | Columnists: Nick Hytrek https://fpru.org/an-anchor-institution-residents-of-emerson-nebraska-buy-groceries-back-columnists-nick-hytrek/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 15:15:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/an-anchor-institution-residents-of-emerson-nebraska-buy-groceries-back-columnists-nick-hytrek/ EMERSON, Neb. – When the Post 60 Market grocery store opens soon in Emerson, the community will literally run the store. If necessary, many residents here might be willing to work there for free. A number of them have already done so, showing up once, twice or three times to voluntarily unpack shipments of dry […]]]>

EMERSON, Neb. – When the Post 60 Market grocery store opens soon in Emerson, the community will literally run the store.

If necessary, many residents here might be willing to work there for free. A number of them have already done so, showing up once, twice or three times to voluntarily unpack shipments of dry and canned goods and stock the shelves.






Gina Lawrence, below, and Fred Sebade stock shelves at the new Post 60 Market grocery store in Emerson, Neb. They are among the many volunteers who have helped prepare the store for opening.


Jesse Brothers, Sioux City Journal


They are thrilled to have a grocery store in town and will do whatever it takes to make sure they won’t be without one again.

“We have a lot of community support for this,” said Emerson resident Mark Graf. “It’s going better than expected, and it’s exciting. But most of all, I’m excited to have a grocery store back in town.”

He and the rest of the approximately 800 residents of this community, the only one in Nebraska to be located in three counties – Dakota, Dixon and Thurston.

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But since 2018, the highest number here was 0, like zero grocery stores in town after Mike’s Food Town closed.

“We went from grocery shopping in town to driving 20 to 30 minutes to the nearest grocery store,” Graf said of the inconvenience everyone, especially older residents who have a harder time getting to. move, suffered.

They won’t make those trips to Pender, Wayne, West Point, South Sioux City or longer.

As soon as the cash registers arrive, the Post 60 market could open, store manager Brian Horak said on a recent day as more than a dozen volunteers helped him stock shelves with the latest shipment of cash registers. grocery.

“Whenever I need help, many volunteers show up,” Horak said. “Every town needs a grocery store.”

You won’t find anyone at Emerson who disagrees.







Emerson gets a new grocery store

Sean Lawrence, left, Miguel Vazquez, center, and Jace Malasek stock shelves and break down boxes at the new Post 60 Market grocery store in Emerson, Neb. The new store is located in the former hall of the American Legion Post 60 on Emerson’s Main Street.


Jesse Brothers, Sioux City Journal


“That’s what the town needs to keep going. We want to try,” said Fred Sebade, an Emerson farmer who was among the volunteer storekeepers.

In 2020, a group of citizens, together with the village council, began looking for ways to bring a store back to town. With help from the University of Nebraska Extension, they formed a steering committee to explore feasibility and ownership models.

It’s a challenge that many small rural towns face, said Charlotte Narjes, Rural Prosperity Extension Educator.

Without a grocery store in town, older residents who have difficulty driving may choose to move to a community that has grocery stores. The presence or absence of a grocery store can play a role when moving families decide which city to settle in.

“This grocery store is an anchor institution,” Narjes said.

The people of Emerson no longer wanted to be burdened with the lack of a grocery store.

The community formed the Emerson Grocery Cooperative, an ownership model that gives those who buy stock a vote in how the store operates. More than 160 shares have been sold so far, raising more than $120,000, said Graf, chairman of the co-op’s board.

With the old grocery store building sold and unavailable, the co-op board needed a location. In the American Legion Post 60 of Emerson, who was looking to sell his Main Street building that needed some work.







Emerson gets a new grocery store

The Post 60 Market grocery store is located in the former American Legion Post 60 lobby on Main Street in Emerson, Neb. After selling the building to the cooperative that operates the store, the Legion will retain a meeting room in the basement.


Jesse Brothers Sioux Town Diary


Proceeds from stock sales, grants, donations and loans funded the purchase and complete renovation of the former Legion Hall. The store was named Post 60 Market in honor of the Legion, which will retain a meeting room inside.

“It worked perfectly for both the store and the Legion,” said Horak, an Emerson native who as a high school student worked at Mike’s Food Town and at one time operated a grocery store with his brother in Springfield, Nebraska.

Horak will analyze shoppers’ purchases to determine which products to add or remove from the store, which will employ two full-time and six part-time employees.

“The city is going to run the store a certain way, and I’m going to make it happen,” he said. “It’s the store in town.”

Emerson residents seem ready to make it work.

In Sebade’s driveway, co-shareholder and shelf stocking volunteer Janie Gutzmann said she, along with almost everyone else in town, was thrilled to have a grocery store back in town. This added much needed buzz and traffic.

“It’s nice to see cars on Main Street, and that’s what Emerson is going to have again, it’s cars on Main Street,” Gutzmann said.

And those cars will be heading downtown, not on the road, for groceries.

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Shiv Nadar University, Delhi NCR, conferred the title of Shiv Nadar Institution of Eminence by Ministry of Education, Government of India https://fpru.org/shiv-nadar-university-delhi-ncr-conferred-the-title-of-shiv-nadar-institution-of-eminence-by-ministry-of-education-government-of-india/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 10:56:45 +0000 https://fpru.org/shiv-nadar-university-delhi-ncr-conferred-the-title-of-shiv-nadar-institution-of-eminence-by-ministry-of-education-government-of-india/ Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India: Shiv Nadar University, Delhi-NCR, India’s leading multidisciplinary university was inducted today under the Ministry of Education, Government of India and will henceforth be known as Shiv Nadar (Institution of Eminence Deemed to be University). Established in 2011 by an Act of the State Government of Uttar Pradesh, the University […]]]>


Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India:
Shiv Nadar University, Delhi-NCR, India’s leading multidisciplinary university was inducted today under the Ministry of Education, Government of India and will henceforth be known as Shiv Nadar (Institution of Eminence Deemed to be University). Established in 2011 by an Act of the State Government of Uttar Pradesh, the University became the youngest institution of higher education in the country to be awarded the prestigious title.


The statement was announced on Wednesday, August 3, 2022 by the Ministry of Education, Government of India.


The Institution of Eminence program was announced by the Ministry of Education, Government. from India in 2017 through the University Grants Commission (UGC) create a distinct category of higher education institutions that would enjoy greater autonomy and “aim to be ranked internationally for its teaching and research as one of the top hundred institutions in the world over time”.


Speaking about the announcement, Pro-Chancellor Shikhar Malhotra said: “It’s a proud moment for us. This coveted status is a testament to the contribution of all faculty, students and staff to the University’s goal of providing world-class education in India. As an institution of eminence, we will continue to attract renowned faculty from across India and the world, recruit the most deserving students, create exemplary structures for higher education governance and have a higher social impact through our research and innovation. I am confident that the institution will continue to be home to many firsts and will have a transformative impact on the higher education space. »


Vice-Chancellor Dr. Ananya Mukherjee added, “This is a celebration of our commitment to creating an exceptional institution. In just ten years, he has set a new trajectory for higher education in India. I take this moment to thank my predecessor, Dr Rupamanjari Ghosh, for his contribution leading to this recognition. As we look to the next decade, we will continue to stimulate fundamental thinking within, between and beyond disciplines – be it science, management, entrepreneurship, engineering, humanities and social sciences or the arts. Our focus will remain unwavering on the fundamental pillars of a great university: holistic and multidisciplinary education, research and innovation, and a commitment to the betterment of society. »

The Shiv Nadar Institution of Eminence is a student-centered multidisciplinary research university offering a wide range of academic programs at the undergraduate, masters and doctoral levels. The university was established in 2011 by the Shiv Nadar Foundation, a philanthropic foundation established by Mr. Shiv Nadar, founder of HCL.

About the Shiv Nadar Foundation

Established in 1994 by Shiv Nadar, founder of HCL – a leading US$11.8 billion global technology company, the Foundation is committed to creating a more equitable and merit-based society by empowering people through transformational education and bridging the economic divide. Over the past 27 years, the Foundation has directly touched the lives of more than 36,000 alumni and students through its renowned institutions in literacy, K12 and higher education. Today, the Foundation has a community of more than 100,000 members, which includes not only alumni and students scattered around the world, but also faculty members, business leaders and extended families.


The Foundation has invested more than US$1.1 billion in its seven flagship institutions and initiatives in education and the arts. Currently, nearly 14,000 students and more than 2,000 professors are part of the Foundation, as well as more than 22,000 alumni scattered around the world.


Foundation students have gone on to study at some of the best institutions in the world, including the Ivy League in the United States, and top universities in other countries, including Australia, Singapore, China, and the United Kingdom. Students also work in major companies including Goldman Sachs, Honda, HP, Schindler and several others in India and other regions. Faculty at the Foundation institutions are drawn from top Indian and international universities with a strong focus on research and innovation.


The Shiv Nadar Foundation pursues the philosophy of “creative philanthropy”. It is a powerful model that envisions the creation of institutions designed to last and continue to impact future generations. It is an approach that enables sustained institutionalized philanthropy for long-term, high-impact socio-economic transformation.

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Hwa Chong Institution Strips Counselor Who Spread False Information About LGBT Community Of All Offices https://fpru.org/hwa-chong-institution-strips-counselor-who-spread-false-information-about-lgbt-community-of-all-offices/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 02:59:44 +0000 https://fpru.org/hwa-chong-institution-strips-counselor-who-spread-false-information-about-lgbt-community-of-all-offices/ A school counselor at the prestigious Hwa Chong Institution who disseminated false statistics about the LGBT community has been suspended from all duties. HCI previously banned the unidentified teacher from leading future sex ed classes after a slide from a presentation he gave to students containing a number of lies about the LGBT community was […]]]>

A school counselor at the prestigious Hwa Chong Institution who disseminated false statistics about the LGBT community has been suspended from all duties.

HCI previously banned the unidentified teacher from leading future sex ed classes after a slide from a presentation he gave to students containing a number of lies about the LGBT community was leaked online last month.

Education Minister Chan Chun Sing wrote yesterday in response to parliamentary questions that the school was monitoring the welfare of students and offering support to those who were traumatized by the counsellor’s presentation. The school is also reviewing its curriculum to align with Ministry of Education guidelines.

“The school also emphasized the importance of respect and care for all members of the school community,” Chan wrote.

The presentation, which was shown to a class of 16-year-olds, included fake statistics touting absurd claims linking homosexuality to pedophilia, alcoholism and rape. The invented numbers were traced to a Twitter troll account.

A so-called conversion therapy video from a local Christian organization was also released.

After photos of the presentation went viral on social media, the school released a statement saying it was not endorsed by faculty and was not representative of the school’s values.

Women’s rights group AWARE recently launched an online sex education website linking to various sex-related resources in response to the incident.

Other stories you should check out:

Tiesto and Zedd to headline ZoukOut Singapore in December

AWARE Singapore launches site to educate young people on ‘taboo’ topics overlooked in mainstream sex education

Honor the Dead at Haw Par Villa’s First-Ever Spirits Festival

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Lewis-Clark State Named NAIA Champions of Character Five-Star Institution | Idaho https://fpru.org/lewis-clark-state-named-naia-champions-of-character-five-star-institution-idaho/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 23:08:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/lewis-clark-state-named-naia-champions-of-character-five-star-institution-idaho/ LEWISTON — Lewis-Clark State College was recently named the winner of the Champions of Character Five-Star Institution Award by the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, NAIA officials announced. Each year, the NAIA measures institutions on demonstrated commitment to character champions. Institutions earn points in character building, competitive conduct, academic orientation, character recognition, and character promotion. […]]]>

LEWISTON — Lewis-Clark State College was recently named the winner of the Champions of Character Five-Star Institution Award by the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, NAIA officials announced.

Each year, the NAIA measures institutions on demonstrated commitment to character champions. Institutions earn points in character building, competitive conduct, academic orientation, character recognition, and character promotion. Institutions also receive points based on outstanding student-athlete grade point averages and having few or no ejections during competition throughout the academic year.

The Champions of Character scorecard measures a commitment to character development, academic focus, character promotion, competitive conduct, and character recognition on a scale of 0 to 100 points. Reward levels are based on the number of points earned: Gold (90-100 points), Silver (75-89 points) and Bronze (60-74 points).

LC State received a silver medal and was one of 157 NAIA institutions to win the Champions of Character Five-Star Institution award.

The NAIA launched the Champions of Character program in 2000 to create an environment in which every student-athlete, coach, official and spectator is committed to the true spirit of competition through the five core values: integrity, respect, responsibility, spirit sports and servant leadership.


The US Forest Service says Moose Fire was

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Law student discovers Catholic educational institution enforces religious code of conduct https://fpru.org/law-student-discovers-catholic-educational-institution-enforces-religious-code-of-conduct/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 17:44:06 +0000 https://fpru.org/law-student-discovers-catholic-educational-institution-enforces-religious-code-of-conduct/ Who thought Leviticus would take the accountability exam? There are a few stock issues to deal with when some bright-eyed 0Ls approach and ask for advice on going to law school. The first is to tell them not to go to law school. No, seriously, please think about it. Many liberal arts graduates looking for […]]]>

Who thought Leviticus would take the accountability exam?

There are a few stock issues to deal with when some bright-eyed 0Ls approach and ask for advice on going to law school. The first is to tell them not to go to law school. No, seriously, please think about it. Many liberal arts graduates looking for what to do after their BA in basketry have looked to law as a route to a 6-figure starting salary and proud parents, only to find that most lawyers don’t end up at Cravath and, even if you get Biglaw’s gig, you’re not guaranteed to like it.

After they inevitably don’t listen, I’m sure you go down the usual list. Find a study group. Go read “Perhaps Surrender”. Once you tell them to find a way to cope with stress that doesn’t involve hitting the bottle or Tinder, that’s usually where the information dump stops. Another thing we should add – consider the religious background of the law school you are applying to.

A law student had a rude awakening when he received this email from his JD factory:

I guess most people don’t think about what their law school will think about their twitter or their participation in protests or their posts on finsta while they suffer learning the rule against perpetuities – issues of character and fitness usually arise once you’re already hit. But surveillance is real, and few do discovery better than lawyers. Don’t drink the Kool-Aid as universities are a limitless forum to voice your thoughts and concerns. I would also be wary of dismissing this as “Welp, this is what happens when you go to a private religious school, you should have read the fine print.” Nothing really prevents other private institutions from verbalizing politically divisive content to save face, see Facebook.

A commenter followed up the post with this:

“The best you can do is pass it on to Above the Law. They will publish it with comments, and this will warn potential future students. »

They weren’t wrong. Try not to get canceled by your administration for sharing radical notions such as “people should have access to adequate health care” or that “the result at Obergefell was not morally contemptuous”.

Idk how to feel about this dean email please help [Reddit]


Chris Williams became Social Media Manager and Associate Editor for Above the Law in June 2021. Prior to joining the team, he moonlighted as an underage Memelord™ in the Law School Memes for Edgy Facebook group T14s. He endured Missouri long enough to graduate from Washington University at St. Louis School of Law. He’s a former boatbuilder who can’t swim, a published author on critical racing theory, philosophy and humor, and has a love for cycling that sometimes annoys his peers. You can reach him by email at cwilliams@abovethelaw.com and by tweet at @WritesForRent.

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Treasurer Moore adds five companies to the state’s list of restricted financial institutions https://fpru.org/treasurer-moore-adds-five-companies-to-the-states-list-of-restricted-financial-institutions/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 11:57:50 +0000 https://fpru.org/treasurer-moore-adds-five-companies-to-the-states-list-of-restricted-financial-institutions/ CHARLESTON, WV (WVDN) – West Virginia State Treasurer Riley Moore announced today that he has released West Virginia’s first list of restricted financial institutions, deeming five financial institutions ineligible government banking contracts. Treasurer Moore has determined that BlackRock Inc., Goldman Sachs Group Inc., JPMorgan Chase & Co., Morgan Stanley and Wells Fargo & Co. are […]]]>

CHARLESTON, WV (WVDN) – West Virginia State Treasurer Riley Moore announced today that he has released West Virginia’s first list of restricted financial institutions, deeming five financial institutions ineligible government banking contracts.

Treasurer Moore has determined that BlackRock Inc., Goldman Sachs Group Inc., JPMorgan Chase & Co., Morgan Stanley and Wells Fargo & Co. are engaged in boycotts of fossil fuel companies, according to a new state law , and are no longer eligible to enter into state banking contracts with his office.

“As Treasurer, I have a duty to act in the best interests of the State Treasury and our people when choosing financial services for West Virginia,” Treasurer Moore said. “Any institution with policies aimed at undermining our energy industries, our tax base and our labor market has a clear conflict of interest in handling taxpayers’ money.”

Earlier this year, Treasurer Moore recommended and lawmakers passed Senate Bill 262, which authorizes the Treasurer to publish the list of restricted financial institutions on its website and disqualify any financial institution on the list of restricted financial institutions. state banking contracts. In preparing the List, the Office of the Treasurer reviewed publicly available environmental and social policy statements issued by financial institutions that are currently authorized to do business with its Office as approved public depositories or credit account providers. sweep for short-term funds from the state.

Six financial institutions were initially identified as potentially engaged in energy company boycotts and received written notification. These institutions then had 30 days to submit additional information challenging their possible inclusion on the list of restricted financial institutions. All six institutions submitted responses, which the Treasurer considered alongside each institution’s public policy statements.

Of the six financial institutions initially noted, US Bancorp was not placed on the list because it demonstrated to the Treasurer that it has eliminated policies against funding coal mining, coal power and construction of pipelines of its policy on environmental and social risks.

“Each financial institution on the Restricted Financial Institutions List today issued written environmental or social policies that categorically limit business relationships with energy companies engaged in certain mining, extraction, or use of coal, rather than considering each company’s financial or risk profile,” Treasurer Moore said. “These policies explicitly limit business engagement with an entire energy sector based on subjective environmental and social policies.”

West Virginia collects hundreds of millions of dollars in severance taxes from coal and other fossil fuels each year, which is generally the third largest source of revenue for the state’s general revenue budget. In the most recent fiscal year, the nearly $769 million in departure taxes paid by coal, oil and natural gas companies accounted for 13% of the $5.89 billion in general revenue funds. collected by the state – and this does not include income and other taxes. from employment and economic activity generated by these fossil fuel industries.

A recent report released by the West Virginia University College of Business and Economics found that in 2019, coal mining and coal-fired power generated $13.9 billion in total economic activity and supported nearly 33 000 jobs in West Virginia.

“While the ‘Environmental, Social and Governance’ or ‘ESG’ movement may be politically popular in California or New York, financial institutions must understand that their practices are hurting people throughout West Virginia,” said the Treasurer Moore. “I simply cannot sit idly by and allow financial institutions working against critical industries in West Virginia to profit from the very funds their policies are trying to diminish.”

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MPP: Pope offers ‘words of well-being from a colonial institution’ https://fpru.org/mpp-pope-offers-words-of-well-being-from-a-colonial-institution/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 18:45:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/mpp-pope-offers-words-of-well-being-from-a-colonial-institution/ Kiiwetinoong MP Sol Mamakwa attended the Pope’s apology ceremony and said that while he found words failed others did not, and he hoped it would be a catalyst for healing. Kiiwetinoong MLA Sol Mamakwa sat alongside NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh on July 25 on the grounds of the former Ermineskin Indian Residential School in the […]]]>

Kiiwetinoong MP Sol Mamakwa attended the Pope’s apology ceremony and said that while he found words failed others did not, and he hoped it would be a catalyst for healing.

Kiiwetinoong MLA Sol Mamakwa sat alongside NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh on July 25 on the grounds of the former Ermineskin Indian Residential School in the community of Maskwacis, Alberta, listening to the words of the pope as he spoke of the “deplorable evil” that was visited upon First Nations, Métis and Inuit in residential schools.

Mamakwa told Sudbury.com after the event that many of them needed to hear those words, but for him they were somewhat empty.

“Good colonial institutions talk like that,” he said. “Feel good language.

But he also saw the effect the pope’s words had on the crowd, on people who needed to hear an apology.

“When he asked for forgiveness, it was so heavy. I could feel the emotions of people around us, I could see people holding each other, I could see people crying together, that’s what they needed to hear to begin their healing journey.

The pope is visiting Canada as part of his “penitential pilgrimage,” as he called it. After his Monday appearance in Maskwacis, the pope left for Quebec on July 27, where he will meet with Governor General Mary Simon and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at the Citadelle of Quebec.

He will also hold mass at the National Shrine of Sainte-Anne de Beaupré the next day before meeting with an Aboriginal delegation from Quebec. He will then fly to Iqaluit on July 29, where he will meet privately with residential school survivors before attending a public community event hosted by Inuit leaders.

During his appearance in Maskwacis, the pope expressed his “sadness, indignation and shame”. He also issued an apology to the children who attended the schools.

“I am deeply sorry,” the pope said, “I am sorry and I ask for forgiveness.”

“We’ve heard time and time again that as Indigenous people, governments will do this, institutions will – acknowledging the oppression, but not the colonial policies that continue to be in place,” Mamakwa said in Sudbury. .com. “He talked about some of the abuse, but he never acknowledged the sexual abuse. He didn’t apologize on behalf of the whole Catholic Church, he never talked about the doctrine of discovery.

Mamakwa attended the event to deliver a birchbark scroll, signed by residential school survivors, including himself, calling for the repeal of the so-called Doctrine of Discovery.

The Doctrine of Discovery stems from a series of papal bulls (formal statements by the pope) and expansions, originating in the 1400s. It made it legal for explorers to claim land for their monarchs who felt they could exploit the resources of land, regardless of the original inhabitants.

Although he said the event was too strictly planned for him to have a meeting with the pope, and that the event featured heavily armed security guards, drones and helicopters, he passed the scroll to the indigenous leaders to pass it on.

“There are a large number of Native people across the country who expected some sort of repudiation of the Doctrine of Discovery, but it never happened.”

Mamakwa said it shows him the true heart of the church.

“That’s where they are,” he said. “I mean, he talked about serious investigations into what the churches did to the students, but we already did that, and then nothing happened.”

He said there was also the issue of records regarding schools that the church still holds, as well as “sacred objects” that are still held and often displayed by the church.

Mamakwa says he thinks the global message will be a catalyst for healing, but notes there has been a lack of real action.

It was a message echoed by Indigneous lawyer and former senator, Murray Sinclair. Sinclair is Anishnawbe from Peguis First Nation and Chair of the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission from 2009-2015. abuse them, you must take action to help them recover and pledge never to do this again.

There were also several emotional moments during the event, Mamakwa said, and not all of them were planned. After donating a headdress to the pope, an honor reserved only for those who earn each eagle feather that makes up the crown, Mamakwa said a woman, later identified as Si Pih Ko, immediately stood up when the headdress was placed on the pope’s head. , and began a distressed and moving chant of what many thought was the national anthem, but was (according to Global News reports) actually “Our Village” (Ka ka na Tak) sung in an older dialect of the language of the Four Winds. When she finished, she started talking directly to Pope Francis.

“’You hereby receive legal notice,’ she said in Cree, struggling through tears. “We, the daughters of the Great Spirit and our tribal ruler of the members of Turtle Island, cannot be compelled to any law or treaty that is not the Great Law. We have appointed chiefs in our territories, govern yourselves accordingly. Many said she also told the Pope to remove the headdress, while another man nearby shouted (as can be heard on recordings of the event) “You are a serpent, you are a snake”. It was unclear whether he was speaking to the pope or to those who gave the gift.

Mamakwa said he sat a little close to her and could make out a few words from her song and speech, as her first language is Oji-Cree; but more than anything, he said he felt her anguish.

He too was shocked by the gift of the headdress given to the Pope by Wilton Littlechild, Honorary Chief of the Ermineskin First Nation, but could not comment on the appropriateness of the gift. Mamakwa is Woodland Cree and therefore not as familiar with the traditions of the Ermineskin Cree Nation.

Mamakwa also said he was shocked by the newly paved roads in a community that had none before news of the Pope’s arrival was announced. The federal government is spending more than $35 million for the papal visit, including community-led activities and ceremonies, and to help with travel costs for survivors, as well as support for Indigenous communities in the three regions that the pope visits. Some $2 million is being spent interpreting the events and comments of Pope Francis into indigenous languages.

The Alberta government is also spending up to $20 million — with much of the funding going toward road improvements and infrastructure, like new paving — in Lac Ste. Anne and Maskwacis.

“I saw the paved roads. I saw the catwalks and you just shake your head,” Mamakwa said. “That’s how oppression works, that’s how racism works. This is how these oppressive colonial institutions work. I was happy for the community, but also, there is oppression, colonialism and racism, written everywhere.

Although Mamakwa is still hopeful that this is a first step, he said it was just that, a first step.

“We cannot continue to accept trauma as a way of life for indigenous people,” Mamakwa said. “We can’t continue to see colonialism and we can’t continue to see oppression as a way of life for the Indigenous peoples of this country. The people who promulgated the Doctrine of Discovery never treated us as human beings.

The pope will continue his tour this week and leave for the Vatican on July 29.

The Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program has a telephone helpline to help residential school survivors and their loved ones suffering from trauma invoked by the memory of past abuse. The number is 1-866-925-4419.

Jenny Lamothe is a journalist at Sudbury.com. She covers Sudbury’s diverse communities, particularly vulnerable or marginalized people, including Black, Indigenous, Newcomer and Francophone communities, as well as 2SLGBTQ+ and health issues.downtown.

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Profile: Christina Reed, newly appointed acting director of the New College Institution, looks forward to “the vision or next step for NCI.” | Business News https://fpru.org/profile-christina-reed-newly-appointed-acting-director-of-the-new-college-institution-looks-forward-to-the-vision-or-next-step-for-nci-business-news/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/profile-christina-reed-newly-appointed-acting-director-of-the-new-college-institution-looks-forward-to-the-vision-or-next-step-for-nci-business-news/ Christina Reed, who first encountered New College Institute when it was just the birth of an idea, now leads the institution as interim executive director. Reed, the institution’s deputy director of finance and operations, joined NCI in January 2011. She was named acting director at the June board meeting, effective July 1, replacing former acting […]]]>

Christina Reed, who first encountered New College Institute when it was just the birth of an idea, now leads the institution as interim executive director.

Reed, the institution’s deputy director of finance and operations, joined NCI in January 2011. She was named acting director at the June board meeting, effective July 1, replacing former acting director Karen Jackson.

Reed grew up in Patrick County. The 1996 graduate of Patrick County High School was a first-generation student when she attended Patrick Henry Community College.

“I was actually going to Patrick & Henry Community College determined to be a teacher,” she said, until she “didn’t like the classes.”

Ironically, or perhaps rightly so, these courses were an earlier version of what NCI would eventually offer: distance learning courses with instructors from another college. These were TeleTechNet courses via Old Dominion University: the instructor, who was at a different location, taught via video transmitted to a classroom at the PHCC.

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“They couldn’t see you, but you could see the teacher,” she said. “They forced you to participate because they wanted to know you were there and paying attention by asking a question through the microphone. It wasn’t for me.

While those distance learning courses dissuaded her from teaching, learning accounting steered her interest in a new direction. She ended up graduating from Averett University in 2000 in Business Administration with a major in Accounting.

While in college, she worked at the former Patrick Henry Bank, now Carter Bank & Trust. As a note teller at her operations site, she provided services to the loan department such as verifying applications and calculating interest.

Then she spent from 2003 to 2010 as controller of The Harvest Foundation, doing “any aspect of the foundation’s accounting” and working on “the budget side of grants.”

“I was lucky and got hired under the first executive director, Harry Cerino. He was amazing,” she said. “His vision for everything, especially education, was so unique.”

She visited the sites of groups to which Harvest had given grants. “It was really humbling to be able to see the great work they were doing. … There were some funny ones, and there were some sad ones. It was really nice. It was really from the heart.

It was Cerino who asked, “’Why don’t we have a university? Why isn’t there a place here locally where you can get a four year degree? ‘” — and then set out to make it happen, she said.

Nearly 20 years ago, he started the process to get local support for a university, then got state approval, she said, and “it turned into what NCI started like that.”

The Commonwealth decided on the structure of the NCI, she said: a triple purpose of offering academic degrees, non-credit courses and credentials. It would follow the format of higher education centers along Virginia’s southern border: the Southern Virginia Higher Education Center in South Boston, the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center in Abingdon, the Roanoke Higher Education Center, and the Institute for Advanced Learning and Research in Danville.

Dr. Leanna Blevins was the first employee of the NCI, soon joined by the first Executive Director, the late Dr. Barry Dorsey.

Dorsey “was primarily focused on degrees – bachelor’s and master’s,” she said. “He started to bring in partner institutions, established different types of diplomas based on the feedback received in the region.”

When former Senator William Wampler was executive director of the NCI (2012-2015), she said, “his vision was a new building to bring to downtown Martinsville” and “he overhauled the code,” making sure that the NCI offered workforce development programs in addition to college partnerships. These programs would qualify people for local jobs in areas such as welding, manufacturing and electrical.

Creating skilled workers to meet labor needs was also “to bring potential businesses here,” she said. “If we can train the workforce to meet the needs of this business, maybe they would locate here.”

Afterwards, Blevins served as executive director, from 2016 to 2019, and during her tenure the college board “had a few things they wanted to develop,” such as manufacturing and a possible engineering program.

Karen Jackson, who served as Acting Director from 2019 to June, “has embraced the vision not just locally but across the Commonwealth. … She really thought outside the box. … If the need was local, so much the better; otherwise it was a Commonwealth requirement.

Now that Reed is acting director, “I just get things done,” she said. This will include the development of a new “broadband initiative to train people who will install broadband equipment” and possibly the training of linemen.

The NCI is also now “heavily involved in a grant with the Claude Moore Foundation,” to provide training and support for health professions, Reed said.

Working for NCI “is more than just a job,” Reed said. “It’s an opportunity to be involved in bringing higher education opportunities locally that I didn’t have” during those years she drove an hour a day to and from Averett.

“The people I worked with” were the real highlights of her time at NCI, she said. “When you work closely with someone, they don’t just become your boss; they become your mentor. I’ve had great mentors over the years. Dr. Blevins was an amazing person, then Karen Jackson.

Seeing NCI move from a small downtown building to its own new building, “a massive effort,” was also gratifying, she said. That was Wampler’s vision, “and some were like, ‘There’s no way to do this in a year.’ William Wampler was like, ‘Yes, I can.’

Big things are about to happen with NCI, Reed said: “Our Board of Directors is extremely engaged. The makeup and expertise are phenomenal.

In the fall, the Board will have a strategic retreat, during which they will discuss “the vision or next step for NCI, and with that is [what they are looking for in] the next CEO. My main objective is to help the board of directors in the search for a general manager. »

The retreat “will include the [New College] Foundation and hopefully community partners,” she said.

Reed and her husband, Ricky Reed Jr., and their 9-year-old daughter, Temperance “Tempi” Reed, live in Ridgeway. Her stepson, Colin Martin, just completed a term with the Old Guard in Arlington, where he still lives.

Although Reed is an education administrator, she is also a student: she is studying for a master’s degree in business administration at Liberty University and only has four courses left before completing it.

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