School institution – FPRU http://fpru.org/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 21:29:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fpru.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon-1-150x150.png School institution – FPRU http://fpru.org/ 32 32 Horizon Therapeutics plc announces scientific collaboration with leading research institution to advance autoimmunity and inflammation research https://fpru.org/horizon-therapeutics-plc-announces-scientific-collaboration-with-leading-research-institution-to-advance-autoimmunity-and-inflammation-research/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 13:03:02 +0000 https://fpru.org/horizon-therapeutics-plc-announces-scientific-collaboration-with-leading-research-institution-to-advance-autoimmunity-and-inflammation-research/ Horizon Therapeutics plc today announced that it has entered into a multi-year scientific collaboration with Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to identify novel disease targets and develop therapies for patients with severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The initial focus is the emerging field of immunometabolism, the study of metabolic processes in the body that, […]]]>

Horizon Therapeutics plc today announced that it has entered into a multi-year scientific collaboration with Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to identify novel disease targets and develop therapies for patients with severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The initial focus is the emerging field of immunometabolism, the study of metabolic processes in the body that, when dysregulated, can lead to autoimmunity and inflammation. This is the first project of the collaboration, with other projects to follow.

“Collaboration is key to advancing science and we are very pleased to begin working with Johns Hopkins University,” said Elizabeth HZ Thompson, Ph.D., executive vice president, research and development, Horizon. “By combining Johns Hopkins’ capabilities in preclinical research with Horizon’s expertise in autoimmunity, our teams will advance translation and research efforts to meet the unique needs of different patient populations.

Horizon researchers, in collaboration with experts from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, aim to identify novel metabolic pathways that lead to chronic inflammation and autoimmunity in different subgroups of patients with myositis. This in-depth knowledge of the pathways will then be used to identify new drug targets that may be suitable for drug discovery.

The collaboration comes as Horizon strengthens its presence in Maryland and will be the first tenant of the Alexandria Center® on the Traville Gateway campus in Rockville, Maryland. Once complete, the state-of-the-art facility will support job growth and drive the Company’s ongoing efforts to develop new medicines.

“As Horizon deepens our footprint in the Maryland region, we believe this collaboration will strengthen the world-class scientific thinking and technical capabilities found in Maryland’s life sciences ecosystem,” said Robert Stoffel, Ph.D., Vice President, Research, Horizon. “Working hand in hand with experts from Johns Hopkins University will allow our teams to better understand the biology of the diseases we study and identify new preclinical targets that could lead to new therapies.”

About Horizon

Horizon is a global biotechnology company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of medicines that address the critical needs of people affected by rare, autoimmune and serious inflammatory diseases. Our pipeline is useful: we apply scientific expertise and courage to bring clinically meaningful therapies to patients. We believe science and compassion must work together to transform lives. For more information on how we go to incredible lengths to impact lives, visit www.horizontherapeutics.com and follow us on TwitterLinkedIn, Instagram and Facebook.

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Marriage should be treated as an institution – NGO Founder https://fpru.org/marriage-should-be-treated-as-an-institution-ngo-founder/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 06:04:53 +0000 https://fpru.org/marriage-should-be-treated-as-an-institution-ngo-founder/ In this interview, Hajiya Maryam Hassan Baba, Founder of the Northern Therapist Organization in Nigeria, spoke about the role of the non-governmental organization in accompanying people on how to build healthy marital relationships, the negative impact of divorce on society, etc. What is your conference about? The Northern Therapist Organization in Nigeria is a marriage […]]]>

In this interview, Hajiya Maryam Hassan Baba, Founder of the Northern Therapist Organization in Nigeria, spoke about the role of the non-governmental organization in accompanying people on how to build healthy marital relationships, the negative impact of divorce on society, etc.

What is your conference about?

The Northern Therapist Organization in Nigeria is a marriage institution that coaches and guides young people to build healthy marital relationships. It also helps existing couples to build better relationships. We do this through our services, which are premarital counseling and the annual marriage conference, where we have a large number of people who come together, with guest speakers who are Islamic scholars, marriage professionals and other life entities, to talk about contemporary marriage issues and how to deal with them.

The essence of the conference is to normalize discussions about marital relationships and their health, as well as how they reflect our society. If we have healthy marital relations, we will certainly have a healthy society.

We have a few people who come together to pay for our services, where we will do individual therapy on premarital counseling, but the marriage conference is a free event. Many people can come to learn about healthier ways to navigate their married life and bring it back to society.

What we want to achieve, above all, is to remind people of the importance of marriage for societal change. Also, that marriage is an institution that should be treated as such. This is because getting married is not only enough, it is very important to have a healthy relationship.

So, at the conference, there is a wake-up call for all who attend, on the importance of marital relationships and how they can achieve it. That’s why we have guest speakers like Islamic scholars who would remind us all of the importance of this as per our religion and the reward you get when you are fair to your spouse, supporting and comforting them , and how it leads to having well-grounded children who will contribute to society by not being a nuisance.

What were the successes of the first conference that motivated you to return this year?

In the first event, we had 400 attendees and guest speakers like Hajiya Maryam Lemu, Dr. Abdallah Gadon Kaya. And so far, we’re getting positive feedback on the conference from people who have helped them figure out better ways to navigate their married life.

Since then people have been calling us for another free marriage counseling so they can build a better life. The conference is aimed at single, married and about to be married couples.

Divorce cases in northern Nigeria have been on the rise for a very long time, to the point that some young people are afraid to marry. Why do you think divorce cases continue to increase each year?

The reason is that, first, we have unrealistic expectations from the bride and groom. Everyone wants different things in marriage, but at first you’ll find that the couple doesn’t want to sit down together to check each other out and see if they’re on the same page, so that’s what I expect from you is also what you are expect from me. At the end of the day, they get married and realize that what they want from this marriage is not what they got. And because of that, they are not ready to put much effort into marriage.

Secondly, there is the issue of financial hardship because as you get married you have more responsibilities. So while trying to fulfill this responsibility, especially in the northern part of Nigeria as Muslims, where more female responsibilities fall on the husband’s shoulder, he will be so overwhelmed trying to provide for the needs of the family, as the woman might simply feel neglected or ignored.

And because women can be very emotional, they’ll start to feel like they’re not being given the attention they want. She’ll start to think that’s what marriage is all about. All of these play a vital role in the rise of divorce in society.

An issue that has been gaining attention lately is patriarchy, which this part of the world is known for, as well as the growing issue of feminism, do you see a clash between these two polarizing ideas, which are helping to destabilize marriages in the region?

Yes. It is a difficult time for people now because the balance between Westernization and being Muslim has become a challenge in the marital institution, as has the gap between male education and of the woman.

The point is that as mothers, the focus has always been on the girl – taking her to Islamiyya school, even the scholarships favor the girl. You would see that even in terms of discipline, the parents pay more attention to trying to ensure that the girl is well grounded so that she can be marriageable.

So at the end of the day, you’re preparing a grounded wife, but the husband, on the other hand, isn’t as well rounded because he’s been ignored in the discipline aspect. Now, if these two people get married, they will clash because one is better grounded while the other is not. The problem is that the person who is more grounded is not the one with the mantle of leadership, so it is difficult for them to be led by someone who is less grounded. That’s to say a huge challenge for the marriage institute.

Second, for women, there is a blurry line between what is right and what is beyond limits. So, for some of them who are well-educated, education makes them feel like they can’t submit to anyone, which is contrary to what it is supposed to teach them.

We know that when they get married, there will definitely be a conflict. In this case, I would say that Westernization has brought a challenge.

Social media has also brought huge challenges because until now you could only find out about people’s married life when you were very close to them, but now all you have to do is d Open your Instagram or Facebook and you’ll just hear great stuff. And that thing that you consume affects how you think and how the institution of marriage should be. You will start demanding and comparing things that are not within your partner’s reach. You will start to have unrealistic expectations. And that will bring us back to divorce triggers.

As you said, the focus now has been on educating girls, so much so that we have more enlightened women than men; does it make it harder for women to submit? What is the output?

The way forward is for parents and religious leaders to have a balance and not focus too much on training girls alone while ignoring boys. There was a time when boys were better educated than girls and there were problems, but now it’s the other way around.

Religious institutions should do a lot of enlightenment and sensitization on the importance of educating men about religion. It is because marriage is something that comes from religion. The rules of marriage and how to manage it are in religion. If a man is the head of the marriage, he is supposed to have more knowledge if not equal knowledge. We aim for fairness, not equality. There should be a balance.

But some say that God didn’t create us to be balanced or equal, which is the basis of feminism, where some demand fairness while others advocate for equality, what do you think?

I would like to say that when it comes to achieving a goal and solving a problem, it doesn’t matter who plays the most roles, all that matters is that the goal is achieved. In the realization of a better society, which ideal marriages obviously produce, everyone should have access to it. That’s what we should be looking at. We should also look at how we used to do things and see if they worked for us.

For the sake of clarity, we are not against feminism, so it is wrong to assume that. We believe in a balanced society. We recognize that men are leaders and that women submit to marriages, and there is always power in submission. Thus, we do not give any special treatment to anyone. All we know is that in your role as a woman, you have the ability to do what you have to do, and in your role as a man, you have the ability to do what you have to do.

What is the theme of the conference?

This year’s theme is “Maintaining a healthy relationship”, which is a continuation of last year’s theme: Building a healthy relationship.

What is your advice to the general public on the importance of having a healthy marital institution?

We should know that marriage is not something you just do, it has rules and regulations. You have to know that you are dealing with another human being, so you have to be sensitive, have empathy, learn to communicate and treat marriage as the institution it is, and be fair in order to get the blessings of Allah.

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Death of a schoolboy: teacher, reserved management; the cops visit the facility https://fpru.org/death-of-a-schoolboy-teacher-reserved-management-the-cops-visit-the-facility/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 02:27:28 +0000 https://fpru.org/death-of-a-schoolboy-teacher-reserved-management-the-cops-visit-the-facility/ Death of a schoolboy: Teacher, management reserved Sampigehalli Jurisdictional Police have registered a case of inciting suicide against the teacher and management of Hegdenagar Public School Her Majesty Chaitanya Swamy, DHNS, bangalore, 10 November 2022, 02:46 updated: November 10, 2022, 07:57 ist Police booked a teacher and school management for driving a Grade 10 boy […]]]>

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Death of a schoolboy: Teacher, management reserved

Sampigehalli Jurisdictional Police have registered a case of inciting suicide against the teacher and management of Hegdenagar Public School

Mon Khan.  Credit: special arrangement

Police booked a teacher and school management for driving a Grade 10 boy to suicide.

Moin Khan, 16, has been asked to take time off after he was caught cheating on an exam on Tuesday. Khan snuck off the school campus, climbed onto the terrace of a 14-story apartment in Balaji Layout, and jumped to his death.

Sampigehalli Jurisdictional Police have registered a case of inciting suicide against the teacher and management of Hegdenagar Public School following Khan’s death.

In his complaint to the police, Khan’s father, Noor Mohammed, blamed the teacher and school management for his son’s death. Police investigated a case based on the murder of Mohammed
complaint.

A police team visited Hegdenagar Public School on Wednesday and questioned the teacher and other staff. He also went to the apartment complex to record statements from residents who tried to save him and saw him jump to his death.

Apartment security guards said they initially did not arrest Khan because he was wearing school uniform and accompanying his friend whose family resides in the apartment. They said they were confused.

“We will take action depending on the results of the ongoing investigation,” another officer said. Khan’s body was released to the family on Wednesday after an autopsy at Dr BR Ambedkar Medical College Hospital.

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Local reverend honored after receiving doctorate from foreign institution https://fpru.org/local-reverend-honored-after-receiving-doctorate-from-foreign-institution/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 13:01:10 +0000 https://fpru.org/local-reverend-honored-after-receiving-doctorate-from-foreign-institution/ Reverend Dr Timothy Mncube of Randfontein received his flowers while he can still smell them and was appreciated by friends and family. This was through a celebratory event held in his honor at Usambara in Krugersdorp on October 29. The event to celebrate Reverend Dr Timothy Mncube was packed. Mncube received an honorary doctorate from […]]]>

Reverend Dr Timothy Mncube of Randfontein received his flowers while he can still smell them and was appreciated by friends and family.

This was through a celebratory event held in his honor at Usambara in Krugersdorp on October 29.

The event to celebrate Reverend Dr Timothy Mncube was packed.

Mncube received an honorary doctorate from the Martin Luther King School of Bible and Theology; in Fellowship with International University College Faith Theological Seminary in Finland on November 30, 2020.

Speaking to the Herald in an interview, Dr Mncube Plenary Team Chairman Michael Sosibo said they decided to honor Mncube because he was an exemplary figure in the community of Randfontein and surrounding areas. since many years.

Rev. Dr. Timothy Mncube received an honorary doctorate from the Martin Luther King School of Bible and Theology; in scholarship with the International University College Faith Theological Seminary in Finland.

“We decided to honor Dr. Mncube for his achievement after he received an honorary doctorate. We felt as a team that he simply could not be honored by a university in Finland and not in his country of origin. I then decided to gather the people he had relationships with who had had a positive impact on their lives and informed them of my plans to celebrate Dr. Mncube.

“They bought into my idea of ​​honoring him for his accomplishments by getting a doctorate and having had a mission that went beyond the chair,” said Sosibo, who added that Dr Mncube had dedicated himself to the community work rather than the priesthood.

He is the former Father and Rector of St Paul’s Anglican Church in Mohlakeng.

He was then taken to higher heights which saw him become a priest and rector at St Paul’s Anglican Church in White City Jabavu and also served as director of the community center in Ipeleng.

He resides in Finsbury but has positively impacted those in and around the entire Randfontein community.

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Connor Recck shares his experiences as LGBTQ+ in Trin https://fpru.org/connor-recck-shares-his-experiences-as-lgbtq-in-trin/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 10:05:31 +0000 https://fpru.org/connor-recck-shares-his-experiences-as-lgbtq-in-trin/ Processed with VSCO with g6 preset Connor Recck ’23 Contributing author Everyone always tells you that college will be the best four years of your life. I’ve almost finished my four years at Trinity, and it’s interesting to say the least. Coming here for the fall 2019 semester, I knew college was an opportunity to […]]]>
Processed with VSCO with g6 preset

Connor Recck ’23

Contributing author

Everyone always tells you that college will be the best four years of your life. I’ve almost finished my four years at Trinity, and it’s interesting to say the least. Coming here for the fall 2019 semester, I knew college was an opportunity to reinvent myself. I looked forward to meeting the peers with whom I would spend the next four years; however, in the back of my mind, I couldn’t help but think that I would have a hard time fitting in here.

The summer before my senior year of high school, I officially came out as gay to my classmate. For some time, I had been slowly breaking the news to close friends. It was the first moment I really felt a weight lift off my shoulders. My last year of high school gave me the opportunity to feel good about myself, it was the first time that I felt really connected to my identity.

Coming to Trinity during my freshman year, I once again lost the comfort and stability of living in an environment where people knew the real me. I quickly realized that I had my work cut out. I was no longer surrounded by the people I had grown up with; rather, I was surrounded by strangers. I was now looking for my place on this campus.

During my four years on this campus, I have had the privilege of meeting so many different people. I came to Trinity as a member of the men’s swimming and diving team. I quickly became close to many members of the men’s and women’s teams during my Trinity experience. Due to the pandemic, I made the difficult decision to quit the swim team before my junior season. Many of the decisions I’ve made during my time here have been difficult, but I’ve been fortunate to have developed an invaluable network of friends who have stuck by my side.

It wasn’t always easy being a gay man on a sports team. My freshman year was filled with many ups and downs, but to the teammates who supported me through thick and thin, thank you. Some of the nicest people I’ve met in this institution have been in situations where I’m at my lowest; to this support network I’ve built here at Trinity: thank you.

My time in class allowed me to broaden my identity even more. At the start of my sophomore year, I declared my major in public policy and law. Shortly after, I declared a second major in economics. I came to Trinity thinking maybe I’d major in English – and don’t get me wrong, I’ve taken many English courses over my college career, but quickly realized that the English was not the choice for me. After being sent home and back for the fall 2020 semester, I decided to change course. I’m now thrilled to say that I’m on track to complete both majors by spring!

In light of all the situations I’ve found myself in on this campus, my journey with my identity has been difficult. I’m not going to water it down; Trinity is an extremely heteronormative institution. Any LGBTQ person can point this out to you, but I’ve learned to wear those differences like badges of honor. When you stop making comparisons, you can come to find peace with yourself. I came to Trinity constantly comparing myself to the stereotypes that exist on this campus; I’m leaving Trinity this spring hopefully challenging as many of these stereotypes as possible – and doing so with a smile on my face.

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Bubba’s Ice Cream, a Danville institution, plans to move after 64 years to North Main Street https://fpru.org/bubbas-ice-cream-a-danville-institution-plans-to-move-after-64-years-to-north-main-street/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 20:15:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/bubbas-ice-cream-a-danville-institution-plans-to-move-after-64-years-to-north-main-street/ Bubba’s Ice Cream, a Danville institution for frozen treat lovers since 1959, is moving from its original location on North Main Street after closing for the season. The destination serves at 2626 North Main St. will be open for the last time this weekend before resuming March 1 at 2455 Franklin Turnpike next to the […]]]>

Bubba’s Ice Cream, a Danville institution for frozen treat lovers since 1959, is moving from its original location on North Main Street after closing for the season.

The destination serves at 2626 North Main St. will be open for the last time this weekend before resuming March 1 at 2455 Franklin Turnpike next to the Rubens Too restaurant.

Owner John Arnone, who bought the business from founder Clarence “Bubba” Barker’s family in 2016, said owner Roman Eagle Rehabilitation and Health Care Center wanted to demolish Bubba’s building and turn the location into a parking lot.






Bubba’s Ice Cream employee Abbie Wilcox prepares to serve a banana split to a customer on Friday afternoon. Owner John Arnone said the company’s current location will offer its products for the last time this weekend before closing for the season and reopening at a new location on Franklin Turnpike in March.


John R. Crane PHOTOS, Register and Bee


Additionally, Arnone said he was looking for an updated building for his business.

“I had been looking for a new location for several years,” Arnone said Friday morning. “The current facility is old, outdated and inefficient for our needs. We really needed to modernize. »

People also read…

Bubba’s Friday afternoon customers remembered the regular ice cream stops they’ve made at the North Main location for decades.

Seventy-three-year-old Buddy Sigmon grew up less than a mile from Bubba’s home and had frequented the business since he was in elementary school.

“We will miss it,” he said of the current location which has “great people, great food.”

Danville resident Sigmon remembers when Barker opened the facility.

For 65-year-old Blairs resident Starlet Lemon, this was the place to go when she was in high school in the early 1970s.

“You always came to Bubba’s as a teenager,” Lemon said, holding a strawberry ice cream cone in one hand and a split banana in a cup in the other for her hubby. “It was the right thing to do.”







by Bubba

Customers grab treats at Bubba’s Ice Cream on North Main Street on Friday afternoons. Owner John Arnone said the current location will serve produce for the last time this weekend before closing for the season and reopening at a new location on Franklin Turnpike in March.


John R. Crane, register and bee


Before buying Bubba’s nearly seven years ago, Arnone was new to the area and looking for a business to invest in. Bubba’s had fallen on hard times and was closed at the time, Arnone said.

“Roman Eagle had purchased the property and the business,” he said. “They felt it [Bubba’s] was recoverable. I bought the business from Roman Eagle.

Roman Eagle, however, kept the land where Bubba is.







by Bubba

Bubba’s Ice Cream has been at its current location on North Main Street since 1959. Owner John Arnone said the current location will serve its products for the last time this weekend before closing for the season and reopening at a new location on Franklin Turnpike to March.


John R. Crane, register and bee


Arnone felt the company had potential.

Bubba’s is popular for its soft serve ice cream, split banana in a cup topped with homemade maple syrup pecans, as well as its strawberry sundae and hot fudge sundae. Arnone has also offered Italian gelato in the company since 2019.

It also serves hot dogs and barbecue sandwiches.

There may be a few more items when Bubba’s opens in its new location next year, and Arnone wants to open more locations in a few years. The Franklin Turnpike facility will be in a former car wash, comprise more than twice as much space and have drive-thru, he said.

Arnone hopes to franchise Bubba’s in the next three to five years, starting more facilities in Danville and other locations within hours’ drive, he said.

Javita Thomas, who lives near Bubba’s, has been a regular here for about 30-40 years. She didn’t seem saddened by the upcoming move, but the North Main location was more convenient for her.

“It is what it is, but I like it better here,” said Thomas, 45. “I’ll still go to 41 [to the Franklin Turnpike location] because my mother lives there.

Charles Bigelow drove up from near Greensboro, North Carolina, to Bubba’s house with his two children. Whenever he ventures to Danville, he always stops at Bubba’s, he said.

“I can’t come to Danville without coming to Bubba’s,” he said.

Grabbing a strawberry-banana milkshake for himself and cups of ice cream for his 7-year-old daughter Gabriella and 5-year-old son Charles, Bigelow said: ‘It’s just a staple where you can get good food and ice cream.”

Bigelow, 58, has been coming to Bubba for 48 years since growing up in Yanceyville, North Carolina.

“I hate to see them closing this place because I have so many memories,” Bigelow said.

Sigmon was also nostalgic for the site’s closure.

“Every time you drive by here you’ll be like, ‘This is where Bubba used to be,'” Sigmon said.

But loyal customers need only head to Franklin Turnpike to continue enjoying Bubba’s singular ice cream. Bigelow will continue to bring her children to the facility after her move.

“We have to continue the tradition, and they will bring their children to Bubba’s,” Bigelow said.

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UCLA Hosts Inter-Campus Forum of Institutions Serving Hispanics https://fpru.org/ucla-hosts-inter-campus-forum-of-institutions-serving-hispanics/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 05:16:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/ucla-hosts-inter-campus-forum-of-institutions-serving-hispanics/ UCLA hosted an inter-campus forum for faculty and administration on Thursday to discuss progress toward achieving federal Hispanic-serving institution designation. The three-hour Hispanic-Serving Institutions Vision Forum was held in the Ackerman Union Grand Ballroom. UC faculty and administrators, including Chancellor Gene Block, came to discuss goals and statistics regarding the university’s progress toward achieving federal […]]]>

UCLA hosted an inter-campus forum for faculty and administration on Thursday to discuss progress toward achieving federal Hispanic-serving institution designation.

The three-hour Hispanic-Serving Institutions Vision Forum was held in the Ackerman Union Grand Ballroom. UC faculty and administrators, including Chancellor Gene Block, came to discuss goals and statistics regarding the university’s progress toward achieving federal HSI designation and celebrate the findings of a report from the UCLA HSI working group. To become an HSI, at least 25% of the university’s full-time undergraduate student body must be Hispanic. Students, graduates and professors participated in the forum.

Block opened the forum and thanked faculty and attendees for coming together to discuss the initiative, and said he looked forward to the work to be done over the next few years.

Sylvia Hurtado, professor of education and co-chair of the HSI task force, said at the event that earning the HSI designation would help UCLA meet the UC system’s goals for equity and achievement. degrees by the end of the decade. The recent HSI Task Force report was created using discussions and interviews with staff, students, and faculty to both make progress toward achieving the HSI designation and better understand how to serve and support students, added Hurtado.

“Our strengths are that we have the highest retention and completion rates in the UC system, and perhaps among most four-year institutions,” Hurtado said. “But that doesn’t mean our students aren’t struggling. They are talented survivors. They need recognition and support to fly on this campus.

Following the keynote speakers, Marcela Cuellar, professor of education at UC Davis, and Marla Franco, associate vice provost for HSI initiatives at the University of Arizona, gave presentations on implementing the recommendations for moving towards HSI designation and greater equity.

Cuellar, who is also a graduate of the School of Education and Information Studies, said being an HSI should be an active and intentional effort. Some issues continue to make students feel less welcome at UCLA; she herself never received her official acceptance letter upon admission to UCLA, causing confusion and disappointment, she said. Although UCLA was originally her dream school, she chose another university because she felt more welcome there, Cuellar added.

“Even though my heart was here, I had to seize the opportunity — where I felt seen, where I felt welcome, and where there was opportunity,” she said at the event. “That’s still what I see as some of the challenges that continue to persist at institutions like UCLA, but really a lot of our institutions.”

A lively discussion followed the presentations, during which members of the public posed questions to speakers on a panel.

Sonja Diaz, founding director of the UCLA Latino Policy and Politics Institute, asked Franco to discuss curricular changes and the role of faculty in shaping the University of Arizona to receive its current HSI designation. .

Franco responded that leadership, including strong and explicit public support from senior leaders on campus, as well as support and encouragement from faculty to actively engage in HSI initiatives, has served the university well.

Obtaining the HSI designation would make the university eligible to apply for federal funding to improve programming and infrastructure to support its students, Cuellar said.

Although UC campuses do better for Latinx students compared to other universities, equity gaps need to continue to be closed, which may involve cultural change, she added.

Franco said a university must perform intentional introspection and focus on specific roadblocks — such as enrollment management plans and strategies, or financial support — to sustain progress toward HSI transformation.

“These types of things also require dedicated financial resources. … Access to our institutions requires a plan,” Franco said at the event. “What are those parts and how do we spell that now? … How do we ensure that UCLA is an institution where students can feel they can bring their whole being?

Elizabeth Gonzalez, inaugural director of UCLA’s HSI, then delivered closing remarks. She said progress towards becoming an HSI must involve a balance of research, practice and support.

“Sometimes it’s very difficult to bridge that gap, to move from those abstract concepts and theory to the day-to-day practice of this work,” Gonzalez said at the event. “You need to have institutional leaders who support you and bring visibility to this work – that is, if you don’t, good luck.”

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Ojukwu University set to industrialize institution, state with science, technology and innovation – The Sun Nigeria https://fpru.org/ojukwu-university-set-to-industrialize-institution-state-with-science-technology-and-innovation-the-sun-nigeria/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 11:42:17 +0000 https://fpru.org/ojukwu-university-set-to-industrialize-institution-state-with-science-technology-and-innovation-the-sun-nigeria/ By David Onwuchekwa Nnewi Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University (COOU) in Anambra State has identified science, technology, innovation and entrepreneurship as the foundation for all meaningful development in society. This was the subject of the 4th International Conference and Exhibition organized by the Faculty of Physical Sciences, Chukwuemeka Odumwgwu Ojukwu University, Uli, Anambra State, in association […]]]>

By David Onwuchekwa Nnewi

Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University (COOU) in Anambra State has identified science, technology, innovation and entrepreneurship as the foundation for all meaningful development in society.

This was the subject of the 4th International Conference and Exhibition organized by the Faculty of Physical Sciences, Chukwuemeka Odumwgwu Ojukwu University, Uli, Anambra State, in association with Anambra State Petroleum and Mineral Resources.

In the 5-day program which included presentations from academics and other off-campus resource persons, the University’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor Greg Nwakoby, said the theme of this year’s conference : Advancing Nigerian content development for industrial productivity and sustainable digital economy was appropriate.

Apt in the sense that he believed it corresponded to the desire of the state government to create a technologically advanced and economically viable state.

The VC noted that the vision of the founding fathers of the University was to raise students grounded in science and technology, research and innovations to serve as stepping stones to sustainability and economic empowerment.

The Dean of the Faculty of Physical Sciences, Professor Kingsley Nwozor, during his speech at the conference, noted that the event marked FAPSCON 2022 was special as it was the first time the faculty had worked with the new Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources of Anambra State, described as one of the ministries inherited from the Soludo administration.

“We are also deepening our contacts and networks under the Triple Helix Plus model of connecting universities, government, industry and civil society.

“In all of this, we are accelerating the push for academic industrialization as envisioned by our Vice-Chancellor, Professor Greg Nwakoby. The broad acceptance of the conference across all shades of opinion and social strata is a telling testimony that the FAPSCON message is enjoyable and penetrating,” Professor Nwozor said.

He explained that the theme and activities of this year’s conference and exhibitions were, to a very large extent, the implementation of last year’s conference communiqué.

He said the faculty this time has integrated secondary schools under the banner of the Young Scientists and Future Innovators Program (YSFIP). He told the conference that the idea was to build the scientific confidence of high school students and have them navigate ahead of their peers in the exciting world of innovations.

He noted that the event also exposed the students of the university, including new graduates and young professionals, to living in the digital age through the capacity building workshop on career growth and survival strategies in a digital economy.

“In this context, this year’s conference has been designed to accelerate the pace of our university on the highway of academic industrialization as we activate the Industrial Research and Innovation Endowment Fund (IRIEF). This is a special purpose vehicle to fund and support industry-defined areas of research that aligns with the Nigerian Content Development Program for the development of local technologies and indigenous solutions for industries and businesses,” he noted.

The President, Local Organizing Committee and Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academics), Professor Osita Chiaghanam, on their part, said he was enthusiastic about the renewed vigor with which the Faculty has made its international conference an event. annual, describing it as a huge success for the Faculty and the university as a whole.

He noted that the working relationship between the Faculty and the new Anambra State Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources as a parent of the Ministry of Science and Technology is strong and symbolic.

“Oil and gas is undoubtedly a jealous business, but we hope that science, technology and innovation will in the near future be a stand-alone ministry given the great intellectual capacity and digital visions of the governor of the oil and gas. State of Anambra, Professor Soludo.

“As a hub of academic excellence and a network of upcoming industrial opportunities, the general public is invited to take note of the academic and infrastructural development of the Faculty. The Faculty’s six programs are fully accredited by the National Universities Commission (NUC).

“The fruits of this clean NUC health check are further manifested in the quality of our graduates, our international engagements, the quality of research outputs, staff ratings, and the student satisfaction experience,” said Professor Chiaghanam.

In his presentation, the State Commissioner for Petroleum and Mineral Resources, Mr. Tony Ifeanya, noted that the theme of the conference captured many references that Governor Soludo had made about his vision and goals for the state. of Anambra during his inaugural address.

He encouraged the need for every school child to receive a 21st century education in the digital age.

The commissioner said the Soludo administration was working to transition the state to a non-oil economy framework via the 21st century imperative of “all technology” to improve productivity, economic growth and social progress.

“Science, technology and innovation have been identified by the United States Government Department of State as the dominant forces in modern society and international economic development.

“The department carries out public policy programs that promote the value of science to the general public; implements capacity building programs in emerging markets that train young men and women to become science and technology entrepreneurs; and strengthens innovation ecosystems globally,” said the Commissioner.

Secondary schools inside and outside Anambra State that participated in the conference with their various exhibits were Divine Rays British School, Obosi; Regina Pacis Madel Secondary School, Onitisha and Chosen International School.

Figures from academia, government, business and industry and various vocations graced the conference.

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New Smithsonian exhibit to explore invisible cell phone connections https://fpru.org/new-smithsonian-exhibit-to-explore-invisible-cell-phone-connections/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 16:10:02 +0000 https://fpru.org/new-smithsonian-exhibit-to-explore-invisible-cell-phone-connections/ The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History will present “Cellphone: Unseen Connections,” a new exhibit exploring the technological, environmental, and cultural impact of cell phones. Through an impressive array of objects, personal profiles and interactive displays, “Cellphone” will offer visitors a chance to explore the many ways cell phones bring us closer to each other, […]]]>

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History will present “Cellphone: Unseen Connections,” a new exhibit exploring the technological, environmental, and cultural impact of cell phones. Through an impressive array of objects, personal profiles and interactive displays, “Cellphone” will offer visitors a chance to explore the many ways cell phones bring us closer to each other, often in ways we never imagined. The multi-faceted exhibition, the first of its kind, will begin on June 23, 2023. The exhibition, with its suite of educational programs, is made possible by a generous donation from title sponsor Qualcomm.

“Cell phones are one of the most important technological creations in the annals of mankind,” said Kirk Johnson, Health Director of the National Museum of Natural History. “We are proud to introduce museum visitors to the behind-the-scenes story of this revolutionary device. We are grateful for the generosity of Qualcomm to help make the show a reality.

To celebrate the announcement, the museum today unveiled a life-size model of Lucy, the iconic ancient human relative, taking a selfie using an iPhone. Visitors can take their own selfies with the famous fossil hominid, which was sculpted by paleoartist Elizabeth Dayne and now sits on the second floor of the museum.

“No technology has influenced the way we live, work and learn as much as wireless communications, which has become the greatest innovation platform of the 21st century,” said Alex Rogers, President, QTL & Global Affairs of Qualcomm. “As one of the world’s leading technology and semiconductor companies, we are proud of the pivotal role our engineers have played in bringing these groundbreaking technologies to fruition and we are honored to support the Smithsonian’s efforts to tell the story of how mobile technology is transforming the world. ”

As the fastest spreading technology in human history, cell phones have become indispensable. With the power of constant connectivity, these devices have reshaped entire industries and revolutionized the way people document and express their lives. But, behind their screens, cell phones tell a deeper story about how people are connected to the earth and to each other through the technology they create.

Mobile phones are at the epicenter of personal networks. But the variety of ways cell phones connect people to others beyond texting and calling are often invisible. To keep these essential devices online, a global system of people and infrastructure operates around the clock. “Cellphone” will help put a human face on this international supply chain to reveal what is involved in manufacturing, l use and maintenance of these devices. Visitors to the exhibit will be introduced to more than 30 people, including innovative engineers making wireless communications possible, young people campaigning for more diverse emojis, and Indigenous activists using language apps to revitalize their native languages.

“Cellphone” will feature over 350 objects ranging from the very first commercial cell phone to the undersea cables that once criss-crossed the Atlantic. The exhibit will also showcase a range of cellphone-related artefacts that have emerged to express identity and culture, including cellphone cases designed by Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, clothing and even a fantasy-shaped coffin. cell phone. Expo visitors can also participate in a cell phone repair game to learn how to extend the use of their phones and navigate a real-world network infrastructure that playfully simulates what it takes to keep our connected phones. Leveraging visitors’ mobile phones, a chatbot will also be accessible for texting and real-time visitor input on exhibit topics.

Visitors to the museum will also have the chance to learn how the elements and minerals that power their phones have been used for millennia. Alongside technological items such as gold-plated SIM cards, copper wires and lithium batteries, gold artwork from ancient Egypt and copper artifacts from western Mexico and the Great Lakes region are exposed. Although their uses and cultural meanings have changed, the importance of these natural materials to human creativity has stood the test of time.

“‘Cellphone’ explores the global histories and natural histories of our mobile devices,” said Joshua Bell, senior curator of the exhibit and curator of globalization at the museum. “Visitors will again see the intersections between culture, nature and technology, which are central dynamics of what it means to be human.”

The exhibition will be accompanied by field trips and after-school programs for middle and high school students, as well as walk-in exhibition programs that invite visitors to contemplate the role of cell phones in their lives, to deconstruct their telephones and the world origins of their components and to imagine more sustainable and ethical telephones of the future. The museum will kick off the opening of the exhibit with an after-hours celebration featuring cellphone repair and digital art workshops, games, storytelling, and themed food and drink.

After the exhibit opens, the museum will launch “Cellphone DiY,” a print-on-demand version of the exhibit that can be installed anywhere in the world for free to further educate the public about the invisible connections people have with their environment. and with each other through cell phones.

About the National Museum of Natural History

The National Museum of Natural History connects people around the world with Earth’s history. It is one of the most visited natural history museums in the world. Opened in 1910, the museum is dedicated to the care and preservation of the world’s largest collection of natural history specimens and human artifacts. The museum is open daily, except December 25, from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, visit the museum on its website, blog, Facebook, Twitterr and Instagram.

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Littleton School of Music is a highly sought after institution offering programs for students in Littleton, CO https://fpru.org/littleton-school-of-music-is-a-highly-sought-after-institution-offering-programs-for-students-in-littleton-co/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 13:39:03 +0000 https://fpru.org/littleton-school-of-music-is-a-highly-sought-after-institution-offering-programs-for-students-in-littleton-co/ Littleton, Colo. – Beyond talent, musical mastery requires passion, dynamism and regular practice, preferably under the tutelage of certified, qualified and experienced music teachers. This is why not all talented individuals become accomplished in their musical fields, while others who start with limited skills beat all odds to become music maestros. Accordingly, armed with passion […]]]>

Littleton, Colo. – Beyond talent, musical mastery requires passion, dynamism and regular practice, preferably under the tutelage of certified, qualified and experienced music teachers. This is why not all talented individuals become accomplished in their musical fields, while others who start with limited skills beat all odds to become music maestros. Accordingly, armed with passion and drive, the next logical step for any aspiring musician would be to identify a reputable music school from which to hone their skills and take them to the next level. Luckily, it’s an easy choice for any budding musician in Littleton, CO, and the surrounding area, thanks to the regionally renowned Littleton School of Music.

Littleton residents of all ages looking for a piano teacher near me can now sigh with relief as the Littleton School of Music offers the lessons they are looking for and so much more. Violin, cello, drums, bass, ukulele, saxophone, trumpet, clarinet, oboe, flute, harmonica, and mandolin are other instruments taught at school. Additionally, its tutors also offer lessons in singing, songwriting, electronic music production, and music for toddlers. It should be noted that the school employs only highly qualified tutors in all of its programs. Learners and parents can rest easy knowing that every instructor in the school has all the credentials and certifications needed to teach and many of them are professional musicians.

Whether you are a beginner or an experienced music enthusiast, Littleton School of Music is the place to be because there is always something new to learn or a skill to perfect. The school’s programs are structured to accommodate learners at all skill levels, from novice to expert. The school’s tutors know how to adapt their lessons to make them fun and challenging without discouraging learners. Realizing that perfecting musical skills is an ongoing endeavor, Littleton School of Music tutors encourage students to keep practicing even at home. They allow them to do this by providing them with recorded lessons that they can use to practice when they are not in school.

While commenting on their experience at Littleton School of Music, one impressed couple said: “We found Littleton School of Music through friends who also go there. We couldn’t be happier! Our children are paired with teachers who are perfect for their personalities. The teachers are energetic and kind and keep our children engaged in the lesson. We are also learning a little music theory! Also, the school is a nice place to wait during lessons.

Since 2006, the Littleton School of Music has consistently helped up to four hundred students per week achieve their musical goals. Aspiring students can learn more about their Littleton office by visiting the school’s website. One of their representatives can always be reached at 303-972-7625 for any questions. The school is located at 6905 S. Broadway, Suite 99, Littleton, CO, 80122, USA.

Media Contact

Company Name
Littleton School of Music
Contact Name
Stephan Hume
Call
303-972-7625
Address
6905 S. Broadway, Suite 99
Town
Littleton
State
CO
Postal code
80122
Country
United States
Website
https://www.littletonmusiclessons.com/

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