Public school – FPRU http://fpru.org/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 04:16:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fpru.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon-1-150x150.png Public school – FPRU http://fpru.org/ 32 32 VYPE ATX Pre-Season Public School Linebacker of the Year Fan Poll Presented by Sun and Ski Sports https://fpru.org/vype-atx-pre-season-public-school-linebacker-of-the-year-fan-poll-presented-by-sun-and-ski-sports/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 17:03:39 +0000 https://fpru.org/vype-atx-pre-season-public-school-linebacker-of-the-year-fan-poll-presented-by-sun-and-ski-sports/ Fast forward about six years and Sophia is already one of the best distance runners in the Greater Houston Area as a sophomore. Nguyen had a spectacular freshman campaign last year at George Ranch, finishing 27th at the UIL Class 6A Cross Country State Meet in a personal best 18:34.40 and placing third in the […]]]>

Fast forward about six years and Sophia is already one of the best distance runners in the Greater Houston Area as a sophomore.

Nguyen had a spectacular freshman campaign last year at George Ranch, finishing 27th at the UIL Class 6A Cross Country State Meet in a personal best 18:34.40 and placing third in the 1600 meters (5:13.91) and 3200 meters (11:27.02) takes place at the regional athletics meeting in the spring.

Nguyen’s finish at the state cross country meet was sixth best among all Greater Houston Area runners, regardless of class.

In four cross country meets leading up to the playoffs last fall, Nguyen finished no worse than sixth and was second twice. It was his first year running 5k competitions.

“I didn’t really start last year with high expectations, being my first year,” Nguyen said. “But now I have more expectations about it. I really want to be consistently under 19 (minutes) and losing times compared to last year.

Nguyen, an avid swimmer, started running cross-country in seventh grade.

“I love competition and being able to improve every time,” she said. “I went into seventh grade thinking I could be pretty good at it, and I used that to be the best I could be.”

Nguyen said the biggest adjustments for her last year were the quality and quantity of competition and the distance, moving from 2km races to the 5km state competition.

Nguyen attributed her state PR to a good race strategy, starting slower than she usually does and picking up the pace in the middle of the race instead of slowing down. She’s been working on her form this offseason, especially keeping her arms and shoulders still and more even.

Nguyen became the top runner on a Longhorns women’s cross-country team entering 2022 after winning 11 straight district championships.

“Sophia is naturally a competitor and that’s something that can’t be trained,” said George Ranch girls’ cross country/track coach Alicia Dutch. “She has the heart of a champion. She’s the type to cheer on her teammates at the end of her run, never complains about a workout and always says, “Coach, I trust you” when we collectively strategize on what’s needed to make her grow. in the sport.

Nguyen has been swimming since the age of five, but only for a club team, First Colony Swim Team. She said swimming and running complement each other.

“When I’m not swimming, I’m running, and when I’m not running, I’m swimming,” Nguyen said. “I always get some sort of distance learning. They are certainly very similar.

Nguyen is excited to see what this season has in store for us. She has learned to feed off the high anxiety she feels before races and use it as fuel. His confidence is at its highest.

“She’s very intrinsically driven, so all she does and everyone sees is herself,” Melissa said. “She is the one who wants to do better and be better. She has that drive.

Nguyen yearns for the destination while respecting the journey.

“If I push myself harder now, I can feel better when I finish,” Nguyen said of his mindset during races. “That’s the thought of success.”

Sophia Nguyen, sophomore at George Ranch.VYPE Media

Other Greater Houston Area runners in Class 6A and Class 5A to keep an eye on this cross country season:

BOYS

>> Carter Gordy, Lake Creek, sr.: Finished 12th in Class 5A State Meet last year with a time of 15:33.7.

>>Pablo Lesarri, The Woodlands, sr. : Finished 15th in Class 6A State Meet last year with a time of 15:33.2.

>> Adrian Hahn Vadstein, Cinco Ranch, sr.: Finished 19th in Class 6A State Meet last year with a time of 15:39.7

>> Colby Hornbeck, The Woodlands College Park, sr. : Finished 25th in Class 6A State Meet last year with a time of 15:50.5.

>> Reese Vannerson, Jesuit Strake, sr.: Finished 26that the Class 6A state meeting last year with a time of 15:50.6.

GIRLS

>> Kathryn Koonts, Klein, jr.: Finished 5th in Class 6A State Meet last year with a time of 17:46.5.

>> Penelope Gracey, The Woodlands, jr. : Finished 9th in Class 6A State Meet last year with a time of 18:07.1.

>> Felicity Hamilton, Klein Cain, jr. : Finished 11th in Class 6A State Meet last year with a time of 18:11.0.

>> Maddy Hunter, Katy, jr.: Finished 24th in Class 6A State Meet last year with a time of 18:31.2.

>> Lydia Butler, Klein Oak, soph.: Finished 25that the Class 6A state meeting last year with a time of 18:32.1.

]]>
Police DAV public school celebrates Teej : The Tribune India https://fpru.org/police-dav-public-school-celebrates-teej-the-tribune-india/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 03:26:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/police-dav-public-school-celebrates-teej-the-tribune-india/ Tribune press service Jalandhar: The Teej festival was celebrated today in the pre-primary wing of the DAV Police State School, PAP campus, with much fervor and gaiety. Principal Rashmi Vij kicked off the celebration by lighting the lamp. For the occasion, children came dressed in magnificent Punjabi costumes. The children enthusiastically participated in […]]]>


Tribune press service

Jalandhar: The Teej festival was celebrated today in the pre-primary wing of the DAV Police State School, PAP campus, with much fervor and gaiety. Principal Rashmi Vij kicked off the celebration by lighting the lamp. For the occasion, children came dressed in magnificent Punjabi costumes. The children enthusiastically participated in the various activities. Along with the children, their parents also fervently participated in modeling and pairs of mothers and daughters, fathers and sons danced to Punjabi songs. All the preparation was done under the supervision of Savita Sharma, head of the pre-primary wing. Director Rashmi Vij congratulated the children and their parents on the occasion of Teej mela. Food, henna and bracelet stalls were set up in the main wing and fun games were also held. On this occasion, a draw was also made during which very attractive gifts were given to the parents of the children. It mainly consisted of a microwave oven, suitcases, sheets, dinner service, wall clock and other very attractive gifts. The children also enjoyed different types of swings. The modeling and dance competition jury included Gargi Sharma and Jaspreet Shahi. 200 children from Kindergarten to Class I participated in the function. The principal handed out prizes to well-dressed children. The result of the dance competition organized on this occasion is as follows: Kavyansh, Ruhan, Jasmin and Avneet Kaur won first place. Second prize went to Sahib Kaur, Wani, Samyra and Kuvera. Radhika, Arjun, Samaksh and Jasmilan were in third place. Tanveer, Ramnik, Ansh and Aarush ranked first in modeling. Harshika, Srija, Gurmannat, Vian and Parneet Kaur were in second place. Chandan, Navriti, Bavannia, Taksh, Inayat and Gursahij were in third place.

Organized orientation program

Lyallpur Khalsa College for Women, Jalandhar has organized an induction and orientation program for new female students corresponding to the 2022-23 session by IQAC department, Lyallpur Khalsa College for Women, Jalandhar. Principal Navjot addressed new students in the seminar room as well as in class. The students were informed about the college and its rich historical past. Students were also informed about internships, achievements, facilities, scholarships, financial aids and proud alumni of the institution. The students were then taken on the college tour where they were shown computer labs, fashion design labs, and language labs, etc. The students felt delighted to see the green and conducive environment of the institution. Then, the timetable for the current session was distributed to them. Towards the end, Principal Navjot congratulated the students and appreciated IQAC and Jaswinder Kaur, Head of Commerce Department and Adjunct Professor Harmohini (English) for their efforts.

Hiroshima Day Observed

Hiroshima Day was celebrated at Eklavya School, Jalandhar, with its message “to mark the tragedy of the 1945 fatal bombing”. A special assembly for peace was organized by the students of class IV. Class IV Sonam featured the poetic narration of the entire Hiroshima nuclear attack sequence and the unimaginable anger faced by the innocent people, graphically depicting the horror of the atomic bomb. JK Gupta (President) and Seema Handa (Director) stated that Hiroshima Day is celebrated on August 6 every year. It aims to promote a policy of peace against war. The day is a reminder of the bombing of Hiroshima by the United States during World War II. The Class III student also spread the message through the various slogans and banners. A competition was also organized on this occasion. Preschoolers took a step forward to spread peace with a silent march for peace displaying various game cards such as peace is patriotic and peace begins with a smile. A role play Sadako Sasaki (Japanese girl) was played by Class III student Nayra. Sadako Sasaki was a survivor of the bombing. Dimple Malhotra (Administrator) and Komal Arora (Principal) encouraged students through the message of peace to take a pledge and swear not to fight.

GOOGLE Tour

Community Roadshow-2022 was organized by Google Developers Group at Guru Nanak Dev University, Regional Campus, Jalandhar. The main objective of the tour was to familiarize the students with the various existing technologies and to help them choose the desired career path. Student coordinator Disha Sharma welcomed the guest and was assisted by fellow students Akshay Sharma, Sajandeep Singh, Jashanpreet Kaur and Aryan Dhingra. Attendees learned about the web roadmap, mobile, building websites from scratch, cloud tour, ML Pathway, and introduction to AI. Associate Dean Jyoteesh Malhotra and Teacher Coordinator Harmandar Kaur praised the efforts of GDG team members Vrijraj Singh, WTM Varsha Jaiswal, Suraj Mani, Anubhav Gupta, Himanshu and Ashwani Kumar. Faculty members who graced the event include Dr. DeepKamal Randhawa, Dr. Butta Singh, Dr. Manjit Singh, Dr. Neena Madan, Dr. Neetika Soni, Dr. Himali, Dr. Vinit Grewal, Dr. Sheetal Kalra, Dr. Varinder Attri. Students gained knowledge on a range of technical subjects and improved their technical skills.

Celebration in tradition

The Teej festival was celebrated with great enthusiasm at the model house branch of St Soldier Divine Public School, in which students and teachers dressed in traditional style. On occasion, the girls showcased their art by performing folk songs, dance, gidha, bhangra and modelling. Vice President Sangeeta Chopra, while congratulating everyone on the occasion of Teej, extended her best wishes to all.

100 participate in the talent hunt contest

With the aim of harnessing the innate talent of the students and aiding in its expression, a talent hunt was organized in the central wing of the DAV Police Public School, PAP Campus, Jalandhar Cantt. During the competition, 100 students from classes VI-VIII took the stage and performed in the music (instrument), music (voice) and dance categories with great enthusiasm and confidence. The preparation for the competition was done under the supervision of Anju Sehgal and Manmeet Mann. The jury included Manpreet Kaur from MGN, Urban Estate, Harpreet Kaur, DIPS Jalandhar, Reena Police DAV Public School. Principal Rashmi Vij appreciated the presentation given by all the students and rewarded the winning students. Results: Class VI (vocal music) First—Bhavya and Kunwarpreet; second-Navkeerat and Akshit. (Instrumental music) First—Rishi and Harvinder, second—Manveer. Dance(western) First—Garima and Divanshi, second—Agam. Dance (Bollywood/Classical) Premiere—Sumona, Inayat and Jhanvi; second-Jiana and Ramya. Dance (folk) First—Kashish, Abhishek; second-Ramandeep and Rudradeep Kaur. Class VII Music (Voice) First—Vans, Second—Paramveer. Music (instrumental) first—Lakshya, Simon, Rajveer; second-Armaan, Darshendra, Aishwarya. Dance(western) First—Ekish; second—Anouchka. Dance (Bollywood/Classical) Premiere—Angel and Aarohi; second-Jiya and Jai Aditya. Dance(folk) First—Harshita, Pavitra and Rajveer and second—Lakshit and Angelica. Class VIII music (vocal) first – Bhavsukhjit, Vikas; second-Sidhi and Anubhav. Music (instrumental) first—Aditya and Sparsh; second-Tanav, Arjun and Divyansh. Dance (Western) first—Jiya, Saksham; second-Mayank and Ananya. Dance (Bollywood/classical) first—Jhanvi, Tavish; second-Suhana and Lakshya. Dance (folk) first—Gurnishan and Shruti; second-Tejaswi and Ipshita.

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A quarter of San Francisco public school students were chronically absent last year | New https://fpru.org/a-quarter-of-san-francisco-public-school-students-were-chronically-absent-last-year-new/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 14:05:06 +0000 https://fpru.org/a-quarter-of-san-francisco-public-school-students-were-chronically-absent-last-year-new/ The San Francisco Board of Education is expected to unveil a plan in October to boost literacy rates, math scores, and college and career readiness. But there is an obstacle to achieving the new goals. More than 25% of San Francisco Unified School District students were chronically absent in 2021-22, the first full year of […]]]>

The San Francisco Board of Education is expected to unveil a plan in October to boost literacy rates, math scores, and college and career readiness.

But there is an obstacle to achieving the new goals. More than 25% of San Francisco Unified School District students were chronically absent in 2021-22, the first full year of in-person learning since the pandemic began.

While SFUSD is not alone in this phenomenon – 72% of public schools experienced an increase in chronic student and teacher absenteeism in the 2021-22 school year – the district’s double increase to 24, 8% is well above the national average of 17%.

“We know that over the past few years, managing the impacts of the pandemic has been incredibly difficult for students and families,” said Jenny Lam, president of the San Francisco Board of Education. “Students missing a lot of time from school are alarm bells – we need to understand the factors and how to provide students with the supports and receive the care they need to learn and succeed.”









A student is considered chronically absent if they miss more than 10% — or 18 days — of the school year, excused or not.

The term was coined in 2010 by education consultant Hedy Chang who found that students who are chronically absent in kindergarten are less likely to read at the grade level in third grade, less likely to do academically at the middle school level, and more likely to drop out of high school. Shortly thereafter, she founded Attendance Works, a San Francisco-based nonprofit organization that focuses on improving attendance practices and policies at all levels of governance.

In San Francisco public schools, one of the biggest increases can be seen among transitioning kindergarten students, 50% of whom were chronically absent last school year compared to 20% in 2020-21 — perhaps because students under the age of 5 were not eligible to be vaccinated until last June.

The other significant increase occurred among the two-thirds of African American, Pacific Islander, and adoptive students and half of Latino students who were chronically absent in 2021-22. This is a significant increase from 2020-21, the year most disrupted by the pandemic – when 45% of African American students, 47% of Pacific Islander students, 46% of adoptive students and 25 % of Latino students were chronically absent.

Even before the pandemic, however, students from these ethnic groups experienced higher levels of chronic absenteeism in San Francisco and across the country, according to education researchers.

“Many of the things that we know are causes or at least strongly associated with chronic absenteeism are unfortunately disproportionately present for students of color,” said Ethan Hutt, associate professor at the University of North Carolina at the Chapel Hill School of Education. “When we talk about schools that have a high prevalence of chronic absenteeism, we want to sort out the things that are within their control and the things that are not within their control.”

The disproportionate impact of the pandemic on historically underserved communities has exacerbated these factors, said Cecelia Leong, vice president of programs at Attendance Works.

She pointed to a Wayne State study chronicling Detroit families’ experiences with COVID-19 and school attendance that found students whose families faced greater economic hardship during the pandemic were more likely to be chronically absent.

“There were significant socio-economic differences between moderately and severely chronically absent students, which reinforces that reducing chronic absenteeism will require social and economic supports beyond what schools alone can provide” , says the study.

The impacts of absenteeism

According to Hutt, whose research at UNC focuses on metrics used to quantify academic performance, the oldest measure is attendance. He noted that while a school’s quality was once determined by its average daily attendance — or the percentage of enrolled students who came to school daily — the reality is that attendance has long been an ambiguous measure.

School districts almost immediately realized that these numbers were easily manipulated,” Hutt said. “It is very difficult to verify who is in the building and so the districts will engage in all sorts of shenanigans to keep their numbers looking good.”

If students missed consecutive days, for example, districts would drop students and re-enroll them upon their return so their absence would not be counted in the final metric.

This happened as recently as 2017, when a high school in Washington, DC graduated all of its diplomas despite a majority missing more than six weeks of school. Some could not even read or write.

Michael Gottfried, a professor at the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania, found that chronic absence has four distinct impacts on students, their classmates, and their school.

The first concerns school finances, since California schools receive state funding based on the number of students who show up each day.

Like Chang, Gottfried found that chronic absenteeism negatively impacts literacy and math scores. However, absences tend to have a greater impact on math than on reading, because although parents read to their children at home, they do not feel as equipped to teach math.

Chronic absence has also been found to impact child development; those who are absent are often less engaged in the classroom and do not want to be there, causing further absences and a cycle of reinforcement.

Finally, Gottfried discovered that his classmates are also affected. For example, if a student has missed a few days of school, the teacher may slow down to catch up, which affects the learning of the rest of the class. On the other hand, if the teacher does not slow down, the student may become confused and disengage from the lesson. Either way, learning is impaired.

Absenteeism imposed by the pandemic

In studying the factors that contribute to absenteeism, Gottfried established four distinct factors: routines, transitions, engagement and health. Seeing a two-fold increase in chronic absenteeism after the pandemic, Gottfried said the COVID-19 pandemic appears to have disrupted all four drivers.

Routines are all about practice, Gottfried said, and while many don’t practice, there are students in kindergarten through third grade who have never practiced school before. Similarly, many have transitioned from elementary to middle school or middle school to high school online.

“The middle schoolers missed out on this whole huge growth element of preteen development,” Gottfried said. “They haven’t been able to have those moments in school that are super engaging, whether it’s making those connections with the teachers or the curriculum or with their peers.”

Besides the obstacles students face in school, some may not even want to return because of concerns about COVID-19, which Attendance Works’ Leong said schools need to address.

“There’s been so much trauma and anxiety and stress from the pandemic that part of the normal transition almost has to be increased, so you’re really dealing with some of the anxiety and the fear of leaving. home or being exposed to COVID,” Leong said. .

The SFUSD Approach

In addition to an ongoing joint research project examining chronic absenteeism at SFUSD with UC Berkeley, the San Francisco public school district offers comprehensive services to help student attendance, said public relations manager Laura Dudnick. of SFUSD.

Once a student has suffered six unjustified absences, School Coordinated Care Teams are supposed to contact the family and schedule a meeting. Based on this meeting, support plans are created, Dudnick said. When a family cannot be reached, the matter is escalated to the district-level Absenteeism Coordinated Care Team, who tries to find other ways to support the family.

Individual schools also have their own methods of promoting attendance. In fact, most students at Independence High School enroll because they have struggled with chronic truancy.

True to its name, Independence offers an independent study program where students create their own schedules and attend small classes with up to 15 students. The school also offers a special education program for students with moderate to severe anxiety, depression, school phobia, and school avoidance.

“Some of the children we take in haven’t set foot in their school for six months or more,” said principal Anna Klafter. “We’re starting from a really tough place with some of our kids and working to get them into school, but also to get them to a place where they can be successful after school and find something meaningful. for them.”

Independence has hired an additional social worker to focus on chronically absent students who may be involved in the juvenile justice system, foster care, are between homes, or face other situations that interfere with school attendance. .

“Adding this position…really upset the results for our Level 3 students,” Klafter said. “She is able to manage 25 children and truly be their go-to person for everything from academics and school supplies to food, housing and family needs, and has just been a real lifeline to students and families.”

Since the program began in 2019 and the additional social worker in 2020, graduation rates at Independence have risen from 54% to 91%, according to Klafter.

While these solutions are specific to Independence High School, Gottfried and Hutt said research shows that when high school students are taught by a teacher of the same ethnicity, attendance rates tend to increase. Serving breakfast in the classroom and placing students with disabilities in general rather than special education classes has also been shown to increase attendance.

Hutt added that communicating with parents about the impacts of absenteeism can serve as an additional solution.

“It doesn’t matter whether we’re talking about new standards or better quality teachers. If the students aren’t there to reap the benefits of what’s happening in the schools, then why talk about anything else,” Gottfried said. “It’s almost like absenteeism/attendance is the first step in trying to create educational opportunities.”

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A quarter of San Francisco public school students were chronically absent last year. What can be done? | New https://fpru.org/a-quarter-of-san-francisco-public-school-students-were-chronically-absent-last-year-what-can-be-done-new/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 20:38:02 +0000 https://fpru.org/a-quarter-of-san-francisco-public-school-students-were-chronically-absent-last-year-what-can-be-done-new/ The San Francisco Board of Education is expected to unveil a plan in October to boost literacy rates, math scores, and college and career readiness. But there is an obstacle to achieving the new goals. More than 25% of San Francisco Unified School District students were chronically absent in 2021-22, the first full year of […]]]>

The San Francisco Board of Education is expected to unveil a plan in October to boost literacy rates, math scores, and college and career readiness.

But there is an obstacle to achieving the new goals. More than 25% of San Francisco Unified School District students were chronically absent in 2021-22, the first full year of in-person learning since the pandemic began.

While SFUSD is not alone in this phenomenon – 72% of public schools experienced an increase in chronic student and teacher absenteeism in the 2021-22 school year – the district’s double increase to 24, 8% is well above the national average of 17%.

“We know that over the past few years, managing the impacts of the pandemic has been incredibly difficult for students and families,” said Jenny Lam, president of the San Francisco Board of Education. “Students missing a lot of time from school are alarm bells – we need to understand the factors and how to provide students with the supports and receive the care they need to learn and succeed.”

A student is considered chronically absent if they miss more than 10% — or 18 days — of the school year, excused or not.

The term was coined in 2010 by education consultant Hedy Chang who found that students missing more than 10 days of school in kindergarten are less likely to read at grade level in third grade, less likely to do well at grade level in middle school and more likely to drop out in high school. Shortly thereafter, she founded Attendance Works, a San Francisco-based nonprofit organization that focuses on improving attendance practices and policies at all levels of governance.

In San Francisco public schools, one of the biggest increases can be seen among transitioning kindergarten students, 50% of whom were chronically absent last school year compared to 20% in 2020-21 — perhaps because students under the age of 5 were not eligible to be vaccinated until last June.

The other significant increase occurred among the two-thirds of African American, Pacific Islander, and adoptive students and half of Latino students who were chronically absent in 2021-22. This is a significant increase from 2020-21, the year most disrupted by the pandemic – when 45% of African American students, 47% of Pacific Islander students, 46% of adoptive students and 25 % of Latino students were chronically absent.

Even before the pandemic, however, students from these ethnic groups experienced higher levels of chronic absenteeism in San Francisco and across the country, according to education researchers.

“Many of the things that we know are causes or at least strongly associated with chronic absenteeism are unfortunately disproportionately present for students of color,” said Ethan Hutt, associate professor at the University of North Carolina at the Chapel Hill School of Education. “When we talk about schools that have a high prevalence of chronic absenteeism, we want to sort out the things that are within their control and the things that are not within their control.”

The disproportionate impact of the pandemic on historically underserved communities has exacerbated these factors, said Cecelia Leong, vice president of programs at Attendance Works.

She pointed to a Wayne State study chronicling Detroit families’ experiences with COVID-19 and school attendance that found students whose families faced greater economic hardship during the pandemic were more likely to be chronically absent.

“There were significant socio-economic differences between moderately and severely chronically absent students, which reinforces that reducing chronic absenteeism will require social and economic supports beyond what schools alone can provide” , says the study.

The impacts of absenteeism

According to Hutt, whose research at UNC focuses on metrics used to quantify academic performance, the oldest measure is attendance. He noted that while a school’s quality was once determined by its average daily attendance — or the percentage of enrolled students who came to school daily — the reality is that attendance has long been an ambiguous measure.

School districts almost immediately realized that these numbers were easily manipulated,” Hutt said. “It is very difficult to verify who is in the building and so the districts will engage in all sorts of shenanigans to keep their numbers looking good.”

If students missed consecutive days, for example, districts would drop students and re-enroll them upon their return so their absence would not be counted in the final metric.

This happened as recently as 2017, when a high school in Washington, DC graduated all of its diplomas despite a majority missing more than six weeks of school. Some could not even read or write.

Michael Gottfried, a professor at the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania, found that chronic absence has four distinct impacts on students, their classmates, and their school.

The first concerns school finances, since California schools receive state funding based on the number of students who show up each day.

Like Chang, Gottfried found that chronic absenteeism negatively impacts literacy and math scores. However, absences tend to have a greater impact on math than on reading, because although parents read to their children at home, they do not feel as equipped to teach math.

Chronic absence has also been found to impact child development; those who are absent are often less engaged in the classroom and do not want to be there, causing further absences and a cycle of reinforcement.

Finally, Gottfried discovered that his classmates are also affected. For example, if a student has missed a few days of school, the teacher may slow down to catch up, which affects the learning of the rest of the class. On the other hand, if the teacher does not slow down, the student may become confused and disengage from the lesson. Either way, learning is impaired.

Absenteeism imposed by the pandemic

In studying the factors that contribute to absenteeism, Gottfried established four distinct factors: routines, transitions, engagement and health. Seeing a two-fold increase in chronic absenteeism after the pandemic, Gottfried said the COVID-19 pandemic appears to have disrupted all four drivers.

Routines are all about practice, Gottfried said, and while many don’t practice, there are students in kindergarten through third grade who have never practiced school before. Similarly, many have transitioned from elementary to middle school or middle school to high school online.

“The middle schoolers missed out on this whole huge developmental element of preteen development,” Gottfried said. “They haven’t been able to have those moments in school that are super engaging, whether it’s making those connections with the teachers or the curriculum or with their peers.”

Besides the obstacles students face in school, some may not even want to return because of concerns about COVID-19, which Attendance Works’ Leong said schools need to address.

“There’s been so much trauma and anxiety and stress from the pandemic that part of the normal transition almost has to be increased, so you’re really dealing with some of the anxiety and the fear of leaving. home or being exposed to COVID,” Leong said. .

The SFUSD approach

In addition to an ongoing joint research project examining chronic absenteeism at SFUSD with UC Berkeley, the San Francisco public school district offers comprehensive services to help student attendance, said public relations manager Laura Dudnick. from SFUSD.

Once a student has suffered six unjustified absences, School Coordinated Care Teams are supposed to contact the family and schedule a meeting. Based on this meeting, support plans are created, Dudnick said. When a family cannot be reached, the matter is escalated to the district-level Absenteeism Coordinated Care Team, who tries to find other ways to support the family.

Individual schools also have their own methods of promoting attendance. In fact, most Independence High School students enroll because they have struggled with chronic truancy.

True to its name, Independence offers an independent study program where students create their own schedules and attend small classes with up to 15 students. The school also offers a special education program for students with moderate to severe anxiety, depression, school phobia, and school avoidance.

“Some of the children we take in haven’t set foot in their school for six months or more,” said principal Anna Klafter. “We’re starting from a really tough place with some of our kids and working to get them into school, but also to get them to a place where they can be successful after school and find something meaningful. for them.”

Independence has hired an additional social worker to focus on chronically absent students who may be involved in the juvenile justice system, foster care, are between homes, or face other situations that interfere with school attendance. .

“Adding this position…really upset the results for our Level 3 students,” Klafter said. “She is able to manage 25 children and truly be their go-to person for everything from academics and school supplies to food, housing and family needs, and has just been a real lifeline to students and families.”

Since the program began in 2019 and the additional social worker in 2020, graduation rates at Independence have risen from 54% to 91%, according to Klafter.

While these solutions are specific to Independence High School, Gottfried and Hutt said research shows that when high school students are taught by a teacher of the same ethnicity, attendance rates tend to increase. Serving breakfast in the classroom and placing students with disabilities in general rather than special education classes has also been shown to increase attendance.

Hutt added that communicating with parents about the impacts of absenteeism can serve as an additional solution.

“It doesn’t matter whether we’re talking about new standards or better quality teachers. If students are not there to reap the benefits of what is happening in schools, then why talk about anything else,” Gottfried said. “It’s almost like absenteeism/attendance is the first step in trying to create educational opportunities.”

Place your free digital obituary

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Delhi Public School Sushant Lok “Future Pioneers” https://fpru.org/delhi-public-school-sushant-lok-future-pioneers/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 12:32:17 +0000 https://fpru.org/delhi-public-school-sushant-lok-future-pioneers/ Nestled in the heart of Gurugram on a 5-acre campus, Delhi Public School Sushant Lok has stood the test of time. Since 2005, students at Delhi’s public school, Sushant Lok, have achieved unprecedented results. 2022 was no different. When the Central Board for Secondary Education (CBSE) declared […]]]>

Nestled in the heart of Gurugram on a 5-acre campus, Delhi Public School Sushant Lok has stood the test of time. Since 2005, students at Delhi’s public school, Sushant Lok, have achieved unprecedented results. 2022 was no different.








When the Central Board for Secondary Education (CBSE) declared the results, the campus was filled with laughter and giggles. From Class X, RudraVedantVuppuluri scored an astonishing 99.4%, closely followed by Swaecha Kapoor with 98.4%.

Class XII results were also stellar. Kirtana Singh Chadha made everyone proud by scoring 98% followed by wonderkid SarthakMaheswari at 97.8%.

Recently, 18-year-old Sarthak from Delhi Public School, Sushant Lok made headlines for being the only one from Haryana to get full marks in JEE Mains. Sarthak has already excelled in not one but all prestigious national and international level exams such as RMO, NTSE, KVPY and SMTE. Grateful to his institution, Sarthak said, “My school and my teachers have been extremely supportive and supported me in all my endeavours.”

Since its inception, Delhi Public School, Sushant Lok, with its extraordinary and innovative approach to education, has laid new foundations for learning.

DPS, Sushant Lok is a premier coeducational day school, open from K-12. The school is led by a very experienced director, Mr. Surender P. Sachdeva and supported by a team of more than 200 passionate teachers. The school is supported by pillars like Shri. NK Singh, Chairman of the 15th Finance Commission, Shri. BK Chaturvedi, Ret. IAS & Padmashree Awardee, Shri VK Shunglu, President of DPS Society and Padma Bhushan Awardee, Ms. ShobhanaBhartia, President and Editorial Director of Hindustan Times Group, and Ms. Meenakshi Singh, Vice President and Director of DPS, Sushant Lok, for n’ to name a few.

DPS, Sushant Lok was recently ranked #18 in India, #2 in Haryana and Gurugram in the India School Merit Awards 2021-22. The school, with its experiential and multidimensional learning pedagogies, is a perfect fit for the leaders of tomorrow. A testament to this is the school’s X and XII CBSE result for the 2021-22 academic session.

The school provides a time-tested roadmap to guide students. The Early Years Program provides enriching experiences for the holistic development of preschool children. It involves all areas of learning – language acquisition, socio-emotional development, physical development, cognitive learning, life skills, creative and aesthetic appreciation.

Primary education focuses on Bloom’s taxonomy, MI skills, inquiry-based, interdisciplinary and experiential learning. The teacher then scaffolds the learning and designs an emergent curriculum based on the child’s interests.

As the child grows through middle school and high school, these pedagogies translate appropriately into their educational model.

A bouquet of hands-on STEM and STEAM activities prepares students for the challenges of tomorrow.

Recently, more than 14 representatives from renowned international universities participated as exhibitors offering in-person university tours at the World Universities Fair at DPS Sushant Lok.

On-site internships at APL Logistics Vascor Automotive Pvt Ltd. Gurugram and internships at Pearl Academy give students an extra edge.

DPS Sushant Lok plays a pivotal role in transforming students into future leaders with cultural and emotional intelligence. Regardless of their age, these pioneers leave an indelible mark on school and society by rising high to touch national and international borders.

The school focuses on holistic development. Students not only learn to value grades, but also to focus on their mental and physical health, art, culture, and sports. DPS Sushant Lok aims to raise peaceful, constructive and positive future leaders. The school calendar of activities is a perfect symphony and balance of the right mix of curricular and co-curricular challenges for every learner.

“It gives me great pleasure to witness the extraordinary feats that our students have accomplished. I believe in the 3 H’s – Honesty, Humility and Hard Work. At DPS Sushant Lok, the mantra of learning is “DO IT TO LEARN IT” and I ensure that staff as well as students are ready to take on challenges as learning opportunities and expect with looking forward to the next challenge,” said school principal Mr. Surrender P. Sachdeva.








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Education Week 2022: Wagga Area Public School Prepares to Celebrate “Creating Futures – Education Changes Lives” | The Daily Advertiser https://fpru.org/education-week-2022-wagga-area-public-school-prepares-to-celebrate-creating-futures-education-changes-lives-the-daily-advertiser/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 22:04:12 +0000 https://fpru.org/education-week-2022-wagga-area-public-school-prepares-to-celebrate-creating-futures-education-changes-lives-the-daily-advertiser/ DANCE: Amayah Morgan of the Ashmont Public School First Nations Dance Group performing in the community. A good education can change a life and help students create their own future, and this is a call for celebration. Public Schools in NSW will celebrate Education Week from August 1, highlighting the achievements of their schools, students […]]]>
DANCE: Amayah Morgan of the Ashmont Public School First Nations Dance Group performing in the community.

A good education can change a life and help students create their own future, and this is a call for celebration.

Public Schools in NSW will celebrate Education Week from August 1, highlighting the achievements of their schools, students and education system with the theme ‘Creating Futures – Education Changes Lives’ .

Public schools continue to celebrate how far their students and learners have come, focusing on how they are creating a future for their students, staff and families.

From early days in daycare to post-school journeys, the public education system aims to prepare young people to be agile thinkers and lifelong learners.

During Education Week, all types of learning are celebrated, from early childhood, through primary and secondary school, and continue into adulthood: learning a trade, entering in higher education or in the labor market.

Learning opportunities in public schools go beyond the classroom and include academic, athletic, cultural, and wellness growth.

Learning may be different for each student and local public schools are equipped to provide learning support for all.

Local Education Week celebrations will include online events, school celebrations and the familiar static displays in Wagga Market Square.

Schools will communicate their events, including through their social media pages.

Opportunities at all levels

There are many examples of how the region’s public schools are creating futures and changing lives – embodying the theme of this year’s Education Week.

Students progress through their educational milestones as they transition from early childhood settings through elementary, secondary, TAFE, college, or the workforce.

Each stage is supported by alliances between teachers, parents and guardians as they work together to build a bright future for students.

At all local public schools in the region, strong communication, collaboration and connections with the community help children build relationships and connections to help make every transition as seamless as possible.

Transition-to-kindergarten programs feature prominently in all public schools and, combined with preschool experiences, provide a solid foundation for future learning.

Many kindergarten students are about to celebrate their first 100 days of school.

Schools seized the opportunity to get involved again in forays, excursions, sporting and cultural events, with school calendars filled with activities and experiences.

Easter parades, STEM challenges, sports carnivals and NAIDOC celebrations come together to create a mosaic of memories.

School resources are helping to create positive learning environments, including new playgrounds for students in Red Hill Public and Lake Albert, as well as the start of reconstruction of classrooms at Wagga Public School .

Mount Austin Secondary School, in conjunction with the NRMA and Wagga Town Council, provided senior year students with support to earn their driving hours.

They obtain their provisional permits while each of the high schools in the region offers post-school courses such as TAFE, internship and university.

Education Week highlights the wonderful achievements that occur at all levels of public education.

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Rising to the Challenge at Flinders Public School | Mercury of Illawarra https://fpru.org/rising-to-the-challenge-at-flinders-public-school-mercury-of-illawarra/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 23:47:51 +0000 https://fpru.org/rising-to-the-challenge-at-flinders-public-school-mercury-of-illawarra/ Windang PS: They pride themselves on their excellent programs which promote self-confidence, resilience, citizenship, respect and responsibility. Photos: provided Windang Public School is a world-class school that provides an exceptional education where students reach their personal best and develop strong communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills. “This year we celebrate 80 years of outstanding public […]]]>
Windang PS: They pride themselves on their excellent programs which promote self-confidence, resilience, citizenship, respect and responsibility. Photos: provided

Windang Public School is a world-class school that provides an exceptional education where students reach their personal best and develop strong communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills.

“This year we celebrate 80 years of outstanding public education,” said Deputy Principal Ashley Davies. “Alumni, families and staff are cordially invited to our 80th day of celebration at the school, followed by a cocktail party at Club Windang on Friday November 4.”

Founded in 1942, the school prides itself on being at the heart of its community, enrolling many children who are second and even third generation students.

“We have a strong focus on creating a safe, happy and caring environment,” she said. “Academic excellence is our goal, balanced with the creative and performing arts as well as sport.

“Our teachers are highly qualified and caring, dedicated to instilling a love of learning in all students, laying the foundation for a full, informed and rewarding life.”

Students and staff enjoy access to a world-class computer network system with brand new interactive whiteboards and video conferencing facilities as well as laptop, Chromebook or iPad provided from K-6 year.

To maximize students’ realization of their reading potential, they have embarked on a journey of reading science with their systematic program in Synthetic Phonetics linking reading, spelling and writing.

Renovation: Classrooms, library and play areas. The values ​​of the school are always safety, unity in learning, respect and cooperation, and equity in work and leisure.

“Our incredible team supports small groups of students in literacy, numeracy and wellbeing as well as sport and creative play,” said Ms Davies. “If you pass by during lunch or recess, you might see our teaching staff and SLSOs in their high visibility vests!”

There are handball, basketball, football, touch football, oztag and running clubs, as well as construction, concrete chalk drawings, band, chess and the painting.

“We believe the best education happens when parents and schools work together,” she added. “Our Parents and Citizens Association (P&C) is actively involved and there is a community gardening club in Windang.

“We offer enrichment programs to enhance our students’ learning. These include robotics, coding, and ‘living’ classrooms.

“Students enjoy the weekly ChiME music and guitar lessons, jamming and choir sessions, the school band and the Southern Stars band.”

All students take part in the NSW Premier reading, writing, spelling, public speaking and sports challenges. Camp trips are organized for students every year.

The Student Leadership Program and other initiatives foster leadership and decision-making in students of all ages.

“We develop confident and articulate students with skills to collaborate with others, solve real-world problems, think creatively, connect through technology, and develop their ethical values, social responsibility and well-being for be engaged citizens,” she added.

“Sport and healthy active lifestyles are promoted and we take advantage of our beautiful natural surroundings providing days of fishing, walking, surfing for sport, as well as surfing safety and awareness.

“Also tennis, lawn bowling and competitive sports like touch football played at the Windang football ground. Students participate in sports and fitness activities not limited to netball, football, swimming program , gala days and carnivals.

“We are proud of our accomplishments, our students, our community and our staff.” See windang-p.schools.nsw.gov.au

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Nicky Campbell reveals he saw friend from prestigious public school being sexually abused https://fpru.org/nicky-campbell-reveals-he-saw-friend-from-prestigious-public-school-being-sexually-abused/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 00:43:02 +0000 https://fpru.org/nicky-campbell-reveals-he-saw-friend-from-prestigious-public-school-being-sexually-abused/ BBC presenter Nicky Campbell today spoke for the first time about witnessing and experiencing sexual and violent physical abuse as a young schoolboy at a Scottish private school in the 1970s. The broadcaster, 61, described how, at age 12, his history teacher ‘brought me – and others – to his knees in joyous moments when, […]]]>

BBC presenter Nicky Campbell today spoke for the first time about witnessing and experiencing sexual and violent physical abuse as a young schoolboy at a Scottish private school in the 1970s.

The broadcaster, 61, described how, at age 12, his history teacher ‘brought me – and others – to his knees in joyous moments when, behind the laughter of the class, he tickled, his fingers wandering on my genitals.

The teacher, whom he named Hamish Dawson, is now dead, he said.

The BBC 5 Live Breakfast host also described seeing his friends being severely sexually abused. In 1971, aged 10, he said he saw a teacher pick on a young student in the showers – something he was “notorious” for among students.

“My friend is laughing but I know from fear that it’s not a good laugh,” Campbell said.

“The teacher has both hands on my friend’s penis and masturbates it. When we walk to the bus stop, we don’t even talk about it and we never will.

The teacher in question has more than 20 child abuse allegations to his name as part of the ongoing Scottish child abuse inquiry, Campbell, 61, wrote in the Mirror.

The broadcaster said he told his story in a bid to bring the man, called ‘Edgar’, to justice. Now married and living abroad, he is proving difficult to extradite, Campbell said.

The man allegedly assaulted dozens of young boys at several schools in Edinburgh and South Africa. His true identity has not been revealed for legal reasons.

“We just accepted it because if he does, it can’t be that bad, can it? And at least he wasn’t doing it during one of his violent tantrums,’ Campbell wrote.

Campbell – whose voice regularly cracked as he recounted his experiences on his podcast, Different – said the abuse at Edinburgh Academy “had a profound effect on my life”.

Nicky Campbell spoke today for the first time about witnessing and experiencing sexual and violent physical abuse as a young schoolboy at a Scottish private school in the 1970s.

The broadcaster, 61, described how, at age 12, his history teacher

The broadcaster, 61, described how, at age 12, his history teacher ‘brought me – and others – to his knees in joyous moments when, behind the laughter of the class, he tickled, his fingers wandering on my genitals. Pictured: 10-year-old Campbell

A pedophile teacher allegedly assaulted dozens of schoolchildren at Edinburgh Academy (pictured) in the 1970s

A pedophile teacher allegedly assaulted dozens of schoolchildren at Edinburgh Academy (pictured) in the 1970s

Campbell, who was born in the Scottish capital and attended Edinburgh Academy before continuing his studies at the University of Aberdeen, also shared his memories of being physically beaten by teachers.

“I was badly beaten at school by a teacher who was a figurehead in the scripture syndicate,” he told BBC 5 Live.

“My mum went as far as she could and got a creeping apology from (the man involved) but she was basically stuck and she was suffocated by the school.

“Those were different times and that stuck with me all my life.”

Campbell, recounting the alleged abuse he witnessed in a locker room shower, said: ‘I can’t describe it here and I can never ignore it.

“This man was known to all of us as a predator and a sadist, but we never told anyone.

“My school friends and I are now talking about it among ourselves – contempt, disbelief and misunderstanding, this kind of thing happened in plain sight and nothing was done.

“And why didn’t we little boys tell anyone in power what was going on? I do not know.’

Campbell, who worked with journalist and child sex abuse victim Alex Renton to tell her story, said the alleged abuser is still alive but has not been named for legal reasons.

Speaking on his podcast, Campbell said the reason he chose to come forward was to bring the man to justice.

In a statement provided to the BBC, the Edinburgh Academy said it “deeply regrets” the alleged incidents and “wholeheartedly” apologized to those involved.

“We have worked closely with the relevant authorities, including Police Scotland, in their investigations and wish to provide reassurance that things have changed dramatically since the 1970s,” the statement read.

“The Academy has strong measures in place to protect children at school with child protection training now at the heart of the Academy’s ethos.”

Nicky was around five years old as a young schoolboy in Edinburgh in 1966. He said the abuse he witnessed had an effect

Nicky was around five years old as a young schoolboy in Edinburgh in 1966. He said the abuse he witnessed had a “profound” effect on his life.

It comes as a South African who taught in schools in southern England between the 1970s and 1990s has been charged with several incidents of sexual assault.

David Price – who did not work at Edinburgh Academy – allegedly sexually abused ten boys between 1970 and 1990, with 33 charges linked to Ashdown House school in East Sussex when Prime Minister Boris Johnson was a pupil there .

UK authorities requested that he be returned to the UK to face justice in November 2018.

But lawyers for the former teacher say Brexit means there is no extradition deal between the two countries.

Price taught history, geography and sport at Ashdown from 1970 to the 1980s.

It happened when a South African who taught in schools in the south of England between the 1970s and 1990s was accused of several incidents of sexually assaulting pupils.  David Price - who did not work at the Edinburgh Academy - allegedly sexually abused ten boys between 1970 and 1990

It happened when a South African who taught in schools in the south of England between the 1970s and 1990s was accused of several incidents of sexually assaulting pupils. David Price – who did not work at the Edinburgh Academy – allegedly sexually abused ten boys between 1970 and 1990

Class photo: Rachel Johnson and David Price, circled

Class photo: Rachel Johnson and David Price, circled

Mr Johnson was a pupil there from 1975 to 1977. There is no indication that he is among the alleged victims. Her sister Rachel was the school’s first girl boarder in 1976. She said, “At that time the three Cs – cane, cricket and the classics – were fetishically followed.”

Price then worked at Brockhurst School in Berkshire in the 1980s and 1990s, where he faces nine other charges. All of the alleged offenses involve sexual touching and performing sexual acts on children or their performing sexual acts on him.

He then moved to South Africa where he taught at a school for the deaf for a decade until his retirement. During this time, one of his pupils nominated him for the Woolworths Teacher of the Year, a national award which he won.

After a year in retirement, he grew bored and found a private tutoring job until his arrest in November 2019 following a request from the UK government.

Different with Nicky Campbell is available on BBC Sounds.

The Prime Minister during his school days at Ashdown House

The Prime Minister during his school days at Ashdown House

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Cybersecurity expert looks into data breach at Waterloo Public School Board https://fpru.org/cybersecurity-expert-looks-into-data-breach-at-waterloo-public-school-board/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 21:24:02 +0000 https://fpru.org/cybersecurity-expert-looks-into-data-breach-at-waterloo-public-school-board/ The Waterloo Region District Public School Board has provided few public details about what it calls “cyber incidents” that impacted its computer system, but a cybersecurity expert said the breach was concerning. The public school board said it was targeted by a criminal group and confirmed data was stolen. The board has not yet specified […]]]>

The Waterloo Region District Public School Board has provided few public details about what it calls “cyber incidents” that impacted its computer system, but a cybersecurity expert said the breach was concerning.

The public school board said it was targeted by a criminal group and confirmed data was stolen. The board has not yet specified what data was taken.

Ali Dehghantanha, professor of cybersecurity at the University of Guelph, said that since the school board collects a lot of personal information, his biggest concern about cyber breach is identity theft and that people’s private information could be used for social engineering attacks.

“If I know your child’s name, your child’s school, maybe even your children’s grades, I can probably set up some very interesting and sophisticated attacks and steal a lot of information from you,” a- he declared. “Having this private information could give attackers an advantage.”

Dehghantanha said the impact of identity theft can be long lasting.

“Imagine if I could steal information, like a social insurance number, from an underage child, keep it for a period of time until they reach a specific age, and then start misusing it. That would be a really, really difficult case to investigate.

However, he said anyone’s information might have been compromised might not have to worry at this time. He suggested monitoring financial transactions closely and being vigilant for receiving random calls.

“We don’t know the extent of the information that has been leaked or stolen by the attackers, so currently we are unable to give a good fair assessment of the impact of people.”

On Wednesday, the school board said it was working to protect people’s personal information, but added it could take weeks before the investigation into how it happened and what was stolen is over.

Dehghantanha said the investigation requires examining how the attackers got the information and what they stole.

“Most of these hacking groups are taking steps to remove their footprints,” he said. “That’s why the investigation would be very, very complicated.”

He recommends businesses and corporations take the necessary steps to protect themselves against hacking, including changing cybersecurity procedures and not storing unnecessary personal information.

“Make sure you have a proper data deletion and destruction procedure policy in place,” Dehghantanha said.

When it comes to users, Dehghantanha said it’s best to only use websites that have two-factor authorization.

“If you make this mandatory, it works 200 times better than making your password policy fancy.”

The school board said it plans to release more information about the cyber incidents early next week.

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Mildred E. Emmons, 92, Holliston Public School teacher for 30 years https://fpru.org/mildred-e-emmons-92-holliston-public-school-teacher-for-30-years/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 01:29:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/mildred-e-emmons-92-holliston-public-school-teacher-for-30-years/ HOLLISTON – Mildred E. Emmons, 92, of Holliston, died at her home Thursday, July 21, 2022. Born in Elmhurst, Illinois, she was the daughter of the late Herberta (Smith) and the late Ralph G. Olsson. She was the wife of the late Peter A. Emmons for 24 years. Mildred earned a bachelor’s degree from Elmhurst […]]]>

HOLLISTON – Mildred E. Emmons, 92, of Holliston, died at her home Thursday, July 21, 2022.

Born in Elmhurst, Illinois, she was the daughter of the late Herberta (Smith) and the late Ralph G. Olsson. She was the wife of the late Peter A. Emmons for 24 years.

Mildred earned a bachelor’s degree from Elmhurst College and a master’s degree from Indiana University and Framingham State University.

She moved to Holliston in 1967 and raised her family there. She was lucky to have her family around town. All of his children and 9 grandchildren graduated from Holliston High School.

Mildred was affectionately known as Millie, Mrs. M&M, Aunt Mildred, Mother, Grandmother and her favourite, Gmom. Mildred was a retired special education teacher for Holliston Public Schools, where she taught for over 30 years.

After retiring from teaching, she worked part-time as a sales accountant at Color Incorporated for 20 years. Mildred enjoyed the time spent volunteering in pastoral care at nursing homes through Saint Michael’s Church in Holliston. She also worked as a Sunday school teacher and religious education coordinator at Saint Michael’s Church. She was very active at Vineyard Metrowest Church in Framingham, where she also taught Sunday school, sang in the Christmas choir and was part of the prayer team.

She supported Agape AIDS Orphan Care, an orphanage for HIV-positive children in India, and even founded a walk to support the cause. She loved going to the movies, making big waves on the ocean, and was an avid card player. She was a founding member of the Effinghamers and was known for her catchphrase, “Angels, Angels”.

Mildred is survived by her children, Thomas R. Emmons and his wife, Carol, David P. Emmons and his late wife, Heidi, and Mary A. Bonaparte and her husband, William, all of Holliston. She also leaves 9 grandchildren, Stephen T. Emmons, Jonathan P. Emmons, Melissa C. Humerick, Andrew R. Emmons, Jared D. Emmons, Colin E. Emmons, Luke I. Bonaparte, Elizabeth J. Bonaparte and William P. Bonaparte; as well as several nieces and nephews. She is predeceased by her sister, Mary Louise Corn and her husband, Robert E.

Private family burial will take place. A celebration of life service will be held, and the time and date are still pending, at Saint Michael’s Church in Holliston.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Agape AIDS Orphan Care, www.agapeorphans.org Arrangements are in the care of Chesmore Funeral Home of Holliston, www.ChesmoreFuneralHome.com

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